From midweight to heavyweight in 24 hours at Lake Tahoe

WoolX, Lake Tahoe
Hiking Lake Tahoe
Photo: Greg K. Hull © Chasing Light Media

While many were readying their superhero attire and prepping for Halloween shindigs, we headed to Lake Tahoe on October 31 for some fall hiking.

Although the day started out a bit chilly, as the sun rose, the day warmed into the upper 60s, perfect for a last fall hike before El Niño arrives in the Sierra for what we hope to be a phenomenal winter of Lake Tahoe skiing.

Lake Tahoe’s Eagle Falls

Eagle Falls, Lake Tahoe, California
Eagle Falls, Lake Tahoe, California
Photo: Kim Hull

One of the prettiest places you can hike can be found on the southwest shore of Lake Tahoe at Eagle Falls above Emerald Bay.

Eagle Falls, Lake Tahoe, California
Eagle Falls, Lake Tahoe, California
Photo: Kim Hull

A popular spot for South Lake Tahoe visitors, the Eagle Falls Loop and Eagle Falls Lake hikes offer stunning views of both Lake Tahoe and the surrounding mountains.

Emerald Bay is located about 10 miles north of South Lake Tahoe on Highway 89. Parking can be found along the highway just outside the trailhead or in the Eagle Falls trailhead lot for a small fee. On the weekends and throughout the summer, Eagle Falls can be very crowded and the highway is busy and fast, so use extreme care when walking near the roadway.

The Eagle Loop is a short, bi-directional trail that involves quite a bit of climbing up and down stairs constructed by the park.

Eagle Falls, Lake Tahoe, California
Eagle Falls, Lake Tahoe, California
Photo: Kim Hull

For the Eagle Lake trail, a self-serve wilderness permit must be obtained at the trailhead. Once past the bridge, the trail involves climbing another stone staircase before leveling off, with Eagle Lake just ahead.

Eagle Falls, Lake Tahoe, California
Eagle Falls, Lake Tahoe, California
Photo: Kim Hull

While the waterfalls are at their peak in the spring, the area is beautiful in the summer and fall as well. Bring a lunch, find a quiet spot and marvel at nature at her finest.

WoolX, Lake Tahoe
Hiking at Lake Tahoe
Photo: Greg K. Hull © Chasing Light Media

From midweight to heavyweight in 24 hours

For our late fall hike, we both wore midweight WoolX tops which were perfect with temperatures beginning at 47°F then warming to 67°F by midday.

So comfortable, WoolX clothing is made from the softest Merino wool with just a bit of stretch, so it both performs well and keeps you warm.

After trying out several WoolX styles about a year ago, we loved their clothing so much we joined on as Brand Ambassadors. Now four seasons in, we live in WoolX year round. It looks great, fits great, and is washable and dryable – as in, you can put it in the dryer and it doesn’t shrink.

For hiking and skiing, we both are fans of the 1/4 zip, which is super comfortable, stylish and keeps you functioning at top performance.

From midweight to heavyweight in 24 hours at Lake TahoeThings change fast around here – we went from midweight on October 31st to heavyweight by November 1st.

Whoa! That must have been some Halloween candy-fest. Granted, while trick-or-treat candy dispensing (in my stylish black WoolX tunic) also resulted in quite a bit of M&M consumption, the fall days of October hiking at Lake Tahoe turned to snow by the next morning, as the first significant winter storm brought a covering of white to the Sierra. Luckily, WoolX comes in multiple weights to accommodate the changing seasons as well.

November 2014 snow forecast#Winter is Here

WoolX base layer for skiing
WoolX base layer for skiing
© Chasing Light Media

Time to tune the skis, kick the ski conditioning into high gear, and pull out the heavyweight WoolX.

Actually, midweight tops and base layers are perfect for skiing on blue bird days, but the heavyweight line is super for cold, blustery January days.

Either way, we’re covered – let it snow!

Best of Reno Tahoe: Squaw Valley
Squaw Valley
Photo: Kim Hull © Chasing Light Media

Disclosure & disclaimer: As brand ambassadors for WoolX, we receive product samples for evaluation and are not otherwise financially compensated by this sponsor. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.