Sunrise to sunset in Cabo San Lucas

Cover: Sunrise on the beach, Cabo San Lucas, Mexico
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


View our Cabo San Lucas photo gallery


Sitting at the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula, the former fishing village of Cabo San Lucas is a popular destination for those seeking sun and fun in a laid-back atmosphere.

DN7R9271Resorts in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

With luxury resorts, a wide variety of activities, great dining options, a vibrant nightlife and, of course, miles and miles of beautiful beaches, each day in Cabo can be filled with as much adventure or relaxation as one desires.

Here’s how we spent a bit of our time in Cabo…

BM3V8725 Sailing at sunset in Cabo San Lucas Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Let the day begin

BM3V8689 Sunrise in Cabo San Lucas Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

As the sun hinted of its quickly approaching presence, it was time to head out to the ocean. With the exception of a scattering of fisherman and a few early risers, the beach was quiet as the waves made their way to the shore.

DN7R9220 Beaches at Cabo San Lucas, Mexico Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Waiting for the warmth of the day to begin, I dug my toes into the cool sand underfoot and simply took in the beauty of the simplicity of the morning. Dozens of fishing charters headed out of the marina, gliding by on the azure waters of the Pacific. A dolphin playfully jumped in the distance. The buildings on the hills basked in the warm glow of the early dawn light.

The sky continued to fill with a myriad of oranges and yellows until, in an instant, the sun reached above the horizon and a new day in Cabo San Lucas was underway.

DN7R9213 Early morning fisherman at Cabo, Mexico Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Do everything or nothing at all

Beach time in Cabo San Luca Beach time in Cabo San Lucas Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

One thing about Cabo – you can fill your day with as much or as little as you please. The resorts have calendars overflowing with activities ranging from blackjack to yoga to pool exercise classes. Not quite your thing? Grab a chair and a book and relax as the Baja sun warms your body and the stresses of the real world melt away.

DN7R9229 Playa Grande Resort, Cabo San Lucas, Mexico Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

While it may be tempting to simply while away to the sound of the ocean for your entire stay, an array of pursuits also await outside the gates of your resort. Spend an afternoon shopping in San Lucas or San Jose, play a round of golf on one of Cabo’s numerous golf courses, or if you are seeking something more daring, several adventure companies offer activities ranging from scuba diving and snorkeling to ziplining to camel rides.

Throughout our stay, we took in our share of beach time, explored San Lucas and opted for a bit of adventure with an afternoon at Wild Canyon.

Take a ride on the wild side at Wild Canyon

Riding camels at Wild Canyon, Cabo San Lucas
Riding camels at Wild Canyon, Cabo San Lucas
Photo: Miriam Fiol

Camel rides in Cabo? You bet! Located about 20 minutes outside of Cabo San Lucas, Wild Canyon is home to ziplines, ATV and UTV touring, a bungee drop, an animal sanctuary and Camel Quest camel riding tours.

Feeding the camels at Wild Canyon in Cabo San Lucas
Feeding the camels at Wild Canyon in Cabo San Lucas
Photo: Miriam Fiol

Our Cabo Camel Ride adventure began with an introduction to the camels we would be riding and some riding instructions. After a fun ride through the canyon, we took a short hike for an up-close view of an unexpected waterfall – something thoroughly enjoyed by the wild animals that call the canyon home.

Feeding the camels at Wild Canyon
Feeding the camels at Wild Canyon
Photo: Miriam Fiol

Following our hike, we rode the camels back to their habitat, where we fed them and learned more about these beautiful creatures.

Camel kisses at Wild Canyon
Camel kisses at Wild Canyon
Photo: Miriam Fiol
Greg Hull at Wild Canyon
Greg Hull at Wild Canyon
Photo: Miriam Fiol

Next up was a tour of Wild Canyon’s Kingdom, an animal sanctuary, where we held….
an iguana

Greg holding an iguana at Wild Canyon in Cabo
Greg holding an iguana at Wild Canyon in Cabo
Photo: Miriam Fiol

and a baby crocodile

Kim holding a baby crocodile at Wild Canyon in Cabo San Lucas
Kim holding a baby crocodile at Wild Canyon in Cabo San Lucas
Photo: Miriam Fiol

and love birds

Love birds at Wild Canyon in Cabo San Lucas
Love birds at Wild Canyon in Cabo San Lucas
Photo: Miriam Fiol

and parrots.

Parrot naps at Wild Canyon in Cabo San Lucas
Parrot naps at Wild Canyon in Cabo San Lucas
Photo: Miriam Fiol
Parrot kisses
Parrot kisses
Photo: Miriam Fiol

We finished our afternoon of adventure with a drink and snacks at the Lion’s Den before being whisked back to our hotel on the Wild Canyon shuttle.

Wild Canyon sunsetSunset at Wild Canyon in Cabo San Lucas Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

As the sun retires for the day…

DN7R9243 Sailing in Cabo, Mexico Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

As nightfall draws near, a new set of options await. Restaurants in Cabo range from quiet to chic, with cuisines spanning the culinary continuum. Many of the larger resorts also hold themed dinners each evening, providing dinner and entertainment without venturing into town.

BM3V8723 Cabo San Lucas marina Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

An additional evening option that combines drinks, dinner and a beautiful way to view the Land’s End is a sunset cruise. Several leave from the San Lucas marina each afternoon and we decided this would be the perfect way to end our last day in the Baja.

DN7R9238 Sailing at Land’s End in Cabo, Mexico Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

As we boarded the boat, we were handed cocktails, which were replenished as often as we wished throughout our evening’s journey. Our first stop after leaving the marina was Lover’s Beach and the El Arco de Cabo San Lucas.

BM3V8726 Lover’s Beach, Cabo, Mexico Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The Arch is a rugged rock formation at the very end of Baja Peninsula, referred to as Land’s End.

BM3V8728 Land’s End, Cabo San Lucas Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The spot is called Land’s End because it is just that – the end of the Baja Peninsula and the point where the Pacific Ocean meets the Sea of Cortez, also called the Gulf of California. Lover’s Beach, or Playa del Amour, is the beautiful, secluded beach next to the Arch.

BM3V8715 Sea lion, Cabo San Lucas Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

After our stop at The Arch, we left the Sea of Cortez and made our way up the Pacific Coast shoreline, with dolphins and sea lions playing in the waters along the way. The crew said whales also could be spotted between late December through March, when the migration brings humpback whales to waters off the shore of Cabo San Lucas.

DN7R9253 Resorts near Land’s End in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

We continued parallel to the shoreline, passing resorts and mansions high on the hills before we turned and casually headed back toward San Lucas. As we gently glided along, the chefs prepared dinner on the grills along the back of the boat.

DN7R9268 Cabo San Lucas, Mexico Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Following a spectacular sky bursting with thousands of shades of orange, the sun disappeared for the day.

DN7R9279 Cabo San Lucas, Mexico sunset Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Anchoring in the bay outside the marina, we enjoyed a delicious dinner of fajitas, an assortment of side dishes and dessert. Following dinner, we enjoyed a glass of wine and some conversation as the lights from the resorts sparkled along the shore.

BM3V8770 Cabo San Lucas at night Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Know before you go

Airport: The San Jose Del Cabo International Airport (SJD) is located about 29 miles / 48 km) from Cabo San Lucas and about 8 miles /13 km from San Jose del Cabo. Transportation to the resorts can be arranged via car rental, taxi, shared shuttles or private shuttles.

Currency: The official local currency is the Mexican Peso but U.S. dollars are widely accepted in Cabo.

Power: Cabo San Lucas uses 110v electricity so power adapters from the U.S and Canada are not required.

Language: Spanish is the national language of Mexico, although some amount of English is spoken by most Cabo locals.

Timeshares: Timeshare sales agents are prevalent in Cabo and are tenacious. You will be offered everything from free cab rides to free activities or even cash for attending a presentation. Unless you want to dedicate half of your day to a high-pressure sales presentation, just say no and enjoy your vacation.


View our Cabo San Lucas photo gallery


Disclosure: The content & opinions expressed are entirely our own. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.

Sunrise to sunset in Cabo San Lucas
Sunrise to sunset in Cabo San Lucas Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Behind the Scenes at the Chaminade Resort & Spa in Santa Cruz Farm to Table Dinners

Cover photo: Chaminade Resort & Spa Farm to Table Dinner, Santa Cruz, California Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


Having visited Chaminade Resort & Spa in Santa Cruz previously, we knew attending one of their highly-acclaimed farm to table dinners would be an amazing experience. A luxury resort and spa that also manages to be comfortable and fun, the hotel is surrounded by 300 acres of tall trees and beautiful vistas. Add to that a friendly staff and phenomenal restaurants, and a visit to the resort is a perfect spot for relaxation, some great hiking, and enjoyment of delicious food and beverages.

Invited to attend the fourth dinner of Chaminade’s 2016 farm to table series, I was instantly curious as to how it was all pulled together and asked if we could go behind the scenes for the event. Chaminade agreed and granted us full access to the event… and it was a spectacular evening of food, wine, and new friends.

Chaminade Resort & Spa’s Farm to Table Wine Dinners

A Toast, Farm to Table Wine Dinner, Chaminade Resort & Spa, Santa Cruz, California
A Toast, Farm to Table Wine Dinner, Chaminade Resort & Spa, Santa Cruz, California
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Now in their ninth season, the Farm to Table Wine Dinners at Chaminade have developed a devoted following of Northern and Central Californians with a passion for the finest in locally sourced cuisine.

Chaminade’s farm to table series includes dinners spaced throughout the growing season, each highlighting the finest ingredients straight from the fields of local farms and expertly paired with wines from a nearby winery. Diners are treated to a delightful evening in an idyllic setting overlooking the Monterey Bay, beginning with a wine reception and followed by a multi-course dinner, with wine poured freely throughout.

Farm to Table Dinner at Chaminde Resort in Santa Cruz
Farm to Table Dinner at Chaminade Resort in Santa Cruz
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

What is Farm to Table?

Fresh produce at the Everett Family Farm Stand
Fresh produce at the Everett Family Farm Stand, Soquel, California
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

While it seems like nearly every restaurant you enter these days uses farm to table or farm to fork to describe their menu offerings, the concept is more than just a trendy phrase. Twenty years ago, if you asked most five-year olds where carrots or potatoes came from, most would probably have answered “the grocery store.” Fortunately, in recent years, an appreciation for food of higher quality has resulted in a resurgence of farmers markets, farm stands and home gardening.

Peppers at the Everett Family Farm Stand
Peppers at the Everett Family Farm Stand, Soquel, California
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Obviously, produce picked, transported only a short distance, and eaten quickly is fresher and more flavorful than those harvested too early to avoid spoilage while they are transported long distances. Simply compare the taste of a homegrown tomato from a backyard vegetable patch to one that was picked greenish, then shipped for days before arriving at a store, and it is easy to understand why chefs embrace the farm to table movement.

Locally sourced ingredients are also at their peak nutritional value, healthier and support and celebrate the small farms that strive to deliver premium products.

Lettuce goriwing at Everett Family Farm
Lettuce growing at Everett Family Farm, Soquel, California
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Farm to table, when crafted by talented chefs, transforms those higher quality ingredients into artisanal cuisine. Typically presented at long tables in stunning surroundings, the farm to table dinner creates a dining experience that is as memorable as it is delicious.

The journey from farm to table

Martin Ranch Winery, grapes on the vine, Gilroy, Califorornia
Martin Ranch Winery, grapes on the vine, Gilroy, California
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

We decided to begin our behind the scenes look at a farm to table dinner by finding out just how local the food and wine that would be served during the dinner really was by visiting the featured farm and winery. We didn’t have to venture far.

The Farm: Everett Family Farm

Sign at Everett Family Farm
Sign at Everett Family Farm, Soquel, California
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Located about four miles from Chaminade, just outside the quaint town of Soquel, California, visitors are greeted to Everett Family Farm on Old San Jose Road with signs proclaiming, “Don’t panic, eat it’s organic” and “Buy Fresh, Buy Local Here.”

The farm stand at Everett Family Farm
The Farm Stand at Everett Family Farm
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

A California Certified Organic Farm (CCOF), Everett Family Farm grows fruit and vegetables on 45 beautiful, sunny acres. Rich and Laura Everett, along with their three daughters, have operated the farm since 2001. In addition to offering organic produce, the Everett’s raise chickens which provide fresh eggs, grow flowers, make an apple cider each fall, and produce an estate grown hard cider, Soquel Cider.

Fresh produce at the Everett Family Farm in Soquel
Fresh produce at the Everett Family Farm in Soquel, California
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Pulling into the farm, lettuce grows in a sheltered building and, off to the left, a charming farm stand awaits filled to the brim with the freshest vegetables, fruits, eggs, and ciders.

The Everetts’ farm stand runs on the honor system. Visitors simply make their selections, then head over to the table to weigh their items, add up what they owe, and leave their payment in the black box.

The honor system at Everett Family Farm, Soquel, California
The honor system at Everett Family Farm, Soquel, California
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

In addition to the farm stand, the Everetts’ produce and products can be found at local farmers markets and grocers. The Everett Family Farm is located at 2111 Old San Jose Road, Soquel and is open from 10 am to 6 pm, seven days of the week except for holidays.

Tomatoes at the Everett Family Farm in Soquel
Tomatoes at the Everett Family Farm in Soquel
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The Wine: Martin Ranch Winery

Martin Ranch Winery entrance
Martin Ranch Winery entrance
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Martin Ranch Winery sits a short 33 miles away from Chaminade at the southern tip of the Santa Cruz Mountains.

Martin Ranch Winery, Gilroy, Califorornia
Martin Ranch Winery, Gilroy, California
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

A beautiful winery with spectacular views and a peacefulness not found in many spots, Martin Ranch was created by Thérèse & Dan Martin, who were both born and raised in the Santa Cruz area.

Serene lake at Martin Ranch Winery
Serene lake at Martin Ranch Winery
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The couple has owned and worked the ranch for over 30 years, producing award-winning red and white wines, gaining praise and a loyal following of wine club fans along the way. Dan produces under the J.D. Hurley label and Thérèse under the Thérèse Martin brand.

Beautiful views at Martin Ranch Winery
Beautiful views at Martin Ranch Winery
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The sign on the winery building says, “Tradition – Passion – Excellence,” and the wines, the winery and the Martins demonstrate those qualities aren’t just words on a placard nailed to the wall. The Martins have a passion and dedication to producing excellent wines while maintaining a commitment to sustainability and preservation of the environment.

Chickens at Martin Ranch Winery
Chickens at Martin Ranch Winery
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

In addition to the vineyards, the winery has large, raised bed gardens and even chickens on the grounds. Very cool and definitely worth a visit! Martin Ranch Winery is located at 6675 Redwood Retreat Road, Gilroy California and is open to the public every first & third weekend of the month from 12-5 PM for tasting and barrel samplings.

Vineyards at Martin Ranch Winery
Vineyards at Martin Ranch Winery
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The Chef: Nick Church

Executive Chef Nicholas Church With Sous Chefs, Farm to Table Wine Dinner, Chaminade Resort & Spa, Santa Cruz, California
Executive Chef Nicholas Church With Sous Chef Jesus and Pastry Chef Erica, Farm to Table Wine Dinner, Chaminade Resort & Spa, Santa Cruz, California
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Executive Chef, Nick Church, and his crew created a six-course menu for the evening, celebrating the locally grown delicacies and wines.

With the exception of taking time away from Chaminade in 2014 to open a restaurant, Chef Church has been with the resort’s culinary team since starting as a line cook in 1994. Now Chaminade’s Executive Chef, he has experienced most of the farm to table dinners at the hotel since their inception.

Chaminade Resort Executive Chef, Nick Church, keeping watch on the dinner
Chaminade Resort Executive Chef, Nick Church, keeping watch on the dinner
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

We grabbed a few minutes of his time and asked him to reflect on how he has seen the farm to table movement change through the years and how local sourcing affects his menu development on a daily basis.

After nine seasons of farm to table dinners at Chaminade, how have you seen the farm to table movement evolve?

“The excitement is still there from everyone including the Farmers, Wineries and the staff. I think the guests receive a fantastic and unique experience while learning about the local food, wine, and ingredients. When we run the dishes in Linwood’s that are created for the farm to table events, they tend to be very successful.”

How does your planning and preparation differ for a farm to table dinner versus a typical banquet or wedding?

“Planning a farm to table dinner takes time. Everyone always asks what’s on the menu but I don’t like writing the menu until I know what the farmer can provide. The ingredients are based on what’s in season and then the menu is created. I take the ingredients and use them in all the dishes and help pair the wines as well. The main goal is to make the guests happy. With weddings and banquets, the dishes are pre-selected usually a month or two in advance and of course pre-sold to the clients. We do try to use as many local ingredients as possible when preparing for dishes for weddings and banquet events.”

For the other 360 days of the year when you aren’t doing a farm to table dinner, how do local food choices factor into your menus at Chaminade?

“This is a tough question. Farm to table events are special to me and gets me and my staff out of our routine so to speak. I am naturally a shy person so getting out in front of the farm to table attendees is exciting for me. We are always trying to use local vendors for produce for Linwood’s as well as the fresh fish when in season to create our specials.”

Chef Nicholas Church & Staff preparing the Lamb Entree, Farm to Table Wine Dinner, Chaminade Resort & Spa, Santa Cruz, California
Chef Nicholas Church & Staff preparing the Lamb Entree, Farm to Table Wine Dinner, Chaminade Resort & Spa, Santa Cruz, California
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The Preparation

We arrived early to catch the staff in motion setting up for the dinner and preparing the two beautifully decorated tables where 96 people would soon gather to enjoy the evening.

Flowers for table at Chaminade Resort & Spa Farm to Table Dinner
Flowers for table at Chaminade Resort & Spa Farm to Table Dinner
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Casual flowers arrangements of sunflowers, daisies, eucalyptus and purple status provided bursts of color along the long white tables. Small jars of wildflower honey from Carmel Honey Company welcomed each guest to their place setting. There’s something about a beautifully set table that evokes excitement and anticipation.

Tables set with flowers at Chaminade Resort & Spa Farm to Table Dinner
Tables set with flowers at Chaminade Resort & Spa Farm to Table Dinner
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Vats of white wine chilled, bottles opened, glasses arranged, and a frenzy of activity occurred in the kitchen and prep areas. With precision, the Chaminade staff expertly pulled all the pieces together and, as the guests arrived, the makings for a perfect evening under clear Santa Cruz skies were all in place.

Martin Ranch Wines await the guests, Farm to Table Wine Dinner, Chaminade Resort & Spa, Santa Cruz, California
Martin Ranch Wines await the guests, Farm to Table Wine Dinner, Chaminade Resort & Spa
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The Dinner

First Course: Reception
Flat Bread, Padron Peppers, Ahi Poke, Scotch Egg, Seascape Strawberry with Blue Cheese, Sliders

As the guests arrived, they selected their choice of wine and chatted casually as an array of appetizers were passed.

Guests arrive at the Farm to Table Wine Dinner reception
Guests arrive at the Farm to Table Wine Dinner reception
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

From delicious strawberries with blue cheese to a mouth-watering ahi poke, the crowd loved the morsels of goodness as the reception kicked into gear. I chose to begin the evening, as I typically do, with a Sauvignon Blanc, which was delightfully crisp and bright.

David pouring Martin Ranch Sauvignon Blanc, Chaminade Resort & Spa
David pouring Martin Ranch Sauvignon Blanc, Chaminade Resort & Spa
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

As I chatted with the winemakers, Thérèse & Dan, Dan told me they use acacia wood barrels, which I found fascinating as acacia trees are what giraffes eat in the Serengeti. How cool! The conversations that occur at dinners like this are priceless.

Dan & Thérèse Martin of Martin Ranch Winery with Kim Hull, Chaminade Farm to Table Wine Dinner
Dan & Thérèse Martin of Martin Ranch Winery with Kim Hull, Chaminade Farm to Table Wine Dinner
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

With wines pouring, guests mingled, old friends reacquainted and new ones were made, as the fun crowd enjoyed the gorgeous late evening views at the resort which reach to Monterey Bay.

View towards Monterey Bay from Chaminade Resort & Spa in Santa Cruz
View towards Monterey Bay from Chaminade Resort & Spa in Santa Cruz
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Second Course: Starter
Heirloom Tomato & Fresh Mozzarella Salad

Course two: Heirloom Tomato & Fresh Mozzarella Salad, Chaminade Resort & Spa Farm to Table Dinner
Second Course: Heirloom Tomato & Fresh Mozzarella Salad, Chaminade Resort & Spa Farm to Table Dinner
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Taking seats at the communal tables, the first course of an heirloom tomato and fresh mozzarella salad arrived. A showcase of the freshness of the late summer produce, the perfectly ripe tomatoes and fresh mozzarella were brimming with both color and taste.

Third Course: Soup
Sun Gold Cherry Tomato Soup

Rod Serving the Soup Course, Chaminade Farm to Table Wine Dinner
Rod serving the Soup Course, Chaminade Farm to Table Wine Dinner
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

A huge fan of tomato soup, I was ready and waiting for this course and it was absolutely wonderful! The soup was fresh, lively and filled with flavor.

As we progressed through the evening, our hosts addressed the group, relating their take on the farm to table experience and what it means from each of their perspectives. Dan Everett talked organic farming. Thérèse Martin brought the winemaker’s take.

ThérèseMartin of Martin Ranch Winery addresses the dinner guests
Thérèse Martin of Martin Ranch Winery addresses the dinner guests
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

And, the very talented, super nice, and uber-cool Kirsten Ponza, Food & Beverage director for Chaminade and former tour chef for the Rolling Stones, relayed Chaminade’s commitment to sustainability and toasted the crowd.

Director of Food & Beverage, Kirsten Ponza speaking to the diners at the Chaminade Resort Farm to Table Dinner
Director of Food & Beverage, Kirsten Ponza speaking to the diners at the Chaminade Resort Farm to Table Dinner
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Fourth Course: Salad
Bambi Little Gem Lettuce, Smoked Goat Cheddar, Honey Crisp Apples, Pistachio, Cider Vinaigrette

Chef Nicholas Church & Staff prepare the salad course
Chef Nicholas Church & Staff prepare the salad course
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The Everetts are well-known and highly praised for their Honey Crisp Apples, so it is no surprise the fruit stole the show with this salad. The crisp, juicy apple that has a devoted, and well-deserved following, so perfectly paired with the smokey cheese and the pistachios gave the salad just the right pop of added flavor.

And, another interesting tidbit picked up from the farm to table dinner. Each of the purveyors has a “his and her” collection in addition to their joint efforts. The above-mentioned Honeycrisp is Rich Everett’s focus, while Laura targets heirloom apples for her ciders. With the Martins, each has their own wine labels, while also a combined winemaking focus.

Fifth Course: Entree
California Lamb, Oven Roasted Yukon Potato with Purple Garlic, Roasted Baby Carrots, Baby Vegetables, Syrah Reduction

Course Five: California Lamb at Chaminade Farm to Table Dinner
Course Five: California Lamb, Oven Roasted Yukon Potato with Purple Garlic, Roasted Baby Carrots, Baby Vegetables, Syrah Reduction at Chaminade Farm to Table Dinner
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Not one, but two thick, juicy pieces of lamb were the stars of the fifth course. It may have been the first time I’ve seen diners high-five over an entrée.

High fives at the table when the lamb arrived at teh Chaminade Resort Farm to Table Dinner
High fives at the table when the lamb arrived at the Chaminade Resort Farm to Table Dinner
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Served alongside Yukon potatoes, baby carrots and with a Syrah reduction, the guests were ecstatic as the dish was presented, and then a hush fell across the tables as they devoured the entrée. For the vegetarians in the group, an exquisite stuffed pepper rounded out the savory portion of the evening’s menu. Served alongside the entrée course, the Martin Ranch Thérèse Vineyards Syrah was sublime. Luscious and spicy, it was elegant and is truly a special wine.

Sixth Course: Dessert
Crème Caramel

Crème Caramel Dessert Plates, Chaminade Farm to Table Wine Dinner
Crème Caramel Dessert Plates, Chaminade Farm to Table Wine Dinner
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Who could think after all that food that we could even entertain dessert, but managed to devour the creme caramel. Rich, smooth and with great caramel flavor, it was a perfect finish to an amazing dinner!

The guests

Guests enjoying the Chaminade Resort & Spa’s Farm to Table Wine Dinners
Guests enjoying the Chaminade Resort & Spa’s Farm to Table Wine Dinners
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

There’s another element to any fabulous party or event – the guests!

Guest enjoying the Farm to Table Dinner at Chaminde Resort in Santa Cruz
Guest enjoying the Farm to Table Dinner at Chaminade Resort in Santa Cruz
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Arriving early and staying late, the Farm to Table guests were there to enjoy the food and wine and simply have some fun – and have fun they did!

Chaminade Resort Farm to Table Dinner guests
Chaminade Resort Farm to Table Dinner guests
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

With a strong contingent from the Martin Ranch Wine Club, groups getting away for the weekend from the bay area, and Santa Cruz locals, the mix of guests made for a lively evening filled with interesting conversations and a relaxed, vibrant atmosphere.

Chaminade Farm to Table Wine Dinner guests
Chaminade Farm to Table Wine Dinner guests
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Many of the guests have attended numerous Chaminade farm to table dinners over the years, creating an experience that feels like a comfortable dinner party given by a talented host. Guests wandered from table to table and even into the prep area, chatting frequently with the Chaminade staff and even giving some of them friendly hugs throughout the evening.

And, speaking of the staff, true hospitality is both an art and skill – and there’s one final element that must not go unmentioned.

Dulcie & Wine Dinner Guest, Farm to Table Wine Dinner, Chaminade Resort & Spa
Dulcie & Wine Dinner Guest, Farm to Table Wine Dinner, Chaminade Resort & Spa
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The Chaminade staff

Rob delivering the entree course at the Chaminade Farm to Table Wine Dinner
Rob delivering the entree course at the Chaminade Farm to Table Wine Dinner
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

From our previous visit and this one, we’ve observed a culture at the resort that focuses on delivering quality in a comfortable, friendly atmosphere. This culture of hospitality is more than serving good food and providing efficient service – it’s what makes the food creative & exceptional and the service not perfunctory, but flawless and generous.

Marshall serving the soup course at the Chaminade Farm to Table Wine Dinner
Marshall serving the soup course at the Chaminade Farm to Table Wine Dinner
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The Chaminade staff delivered a perfectly orchestrated dinner, executed flawlessly. The food was amazing and the service was friendly, with needs and wants anticipated and handled with care.

David pouring the Martin Ranch Winery 2015 Sauvignon Blanc at the Chaminade Farm to Table Dinner
David pouring the Martin Ranch Winery 2015 Sauvignon Blanc at the Chaminade Farm to Table Dinner
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

High praise and thanks to all that worked so hard to make a remarkable dining experience for 96 people on a picture-perfect evening in Santa Cruz!

Kirsten & Marshall, Farm to Table Wine Dinner, Chaminade Resort & Spa, Santa Cruz, California
Kirsten & Marshall, Farm to Table Wine Dinner, Chaminade Resort & Spa, Santa Cruz, California
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Disclosure & disclaimer: Special thanks to Chaminade Resort & Spa for hosting us as their guests. The content & opinions expressed are entirely our own. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.

Chaminade Resort & Spa Farm to Table Dinner September 2016
Chaminade Resort & Spa Farm to Table Dinner September 2016
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

 

Mille Lacs Indian Museum and Trading Post, Minnesota Historical Society, Onamia, Minnesota

Exploring Mille Lacs Indian Museum and Trading Post

Cover: Mille Lacs Indian Museum and Trading Post, Minnesota Historical Society, Onamia, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


While visiting the Mille Lacs Lake area, we stopped by the Mille Lacs Indian Museum and Trading Post to learn more about the history of the area and the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe, who are believed to have settled in region in the 1700s.

A combination of beautiful exhibits, interactive displays, learning stations and educational information, the museum provides a view into the history and lives of the Ojibwe people and, next door, the Trading Post sells handcrafted American Indian arts and crafts.

Pow-wow outfits on display at Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Pow-wow outfits on display at Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

History of the museum

Teaching displays at Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Teaching displays at Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Built in 1996, the museum is one of 26 Minnesota Historical Society sites and museums and is located on the southwest shore of Mille Lacs Lake near Onamia, Minnesota.

The museum resides on the former property of Harry and Jeanette Ayers who began renting cabins on the grounds in the early 1920s. By the late 1930s, the Ayers were running a full resort business with cabins, boats, a trading post, gas station, and even a boat factory and maple syrup refinery.

Trading Post at Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Trading Post at Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Avid collectors of American Indian artifacts, art and memorabilia, the Ayers amassed a vast collection over their years of procuring items for the Trading Post. In 1959, they donated their collection, the buildings and the land to the Minnesota Historical Society.

The donated buildings and collections served as the museum until 1996, when the current building was built as result of a partnership between the Minnesota Historical Society and the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe.

Mille Lacs Indian Museum in Onamia, Minnesota
Mille Lacs Indian Museum in Onamia, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Visiting the Mille Lacs Indian Museum

Canoe at the Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Canoe at the Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Visitors to the museum are treated to a wide variety of displays and exhibits, including hands-on activities for children.

Exhibits at the Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Exhibits at the Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Exploring the spacious 22,810-square-foot museum, visitors learn the story of the Ojibwe people, from what their lives were like when they settled in the area to present day culture.

The Mille Lacs Indian Museum tells the history of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe
The Mille Lacs Indian Museum tells the history of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Many exhibits incorporate both the Ojibwe language and English in their descriptions and provide a glimpse into life on the reservation. We were fortunate to tour the museum with Travis Zimmerman, a descendant of the Ojibwe who is Site Manager of the museum.

Travis Zimmerman in the Four Seasons Room, Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Travis Zimmerman in the Four Seasons Room
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Popular for school field trips, Travis pointed out that the museum provides a wide view of Indian history, accentuating the similarities, not the differences, in the tribes, customs, foods, music, and games.

Displays at the Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Displays at the Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Exhibits from the Ojibwe people at the Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Exhibits from the Ojibwe people
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The jewel of the museum, the Four Seasons Room contains beautifully designed dioramas with life-size figures that depict the life of Ojibwe people throughout the changing seasonal activities.

Life-size figures in The Four Seasons Room at Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Life-size figures in The Four Seasons Room
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

From depictions of harvesting wild rice in the autumn to making maple syrup to hunting and berry picking, the exhibits are exceptional.

Life-size figures in the dioramas at The Four Seasons Room
Life-size figures in the dioramas at The Four Seasons Room
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

While the dioramas date back to 1964 in the previous version of the museum, the life-sized mannequins were added in 1972.

Mille Lacs Indian Museum, The Four Seasons Room
The Four Seasons Room
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Travis explained that casts of actual tribe members were used to create the figures. Imagine how amazing it must be for the children and grandchildren of those members when they visit the museum to see depictions of their parents and grandparents from decades before.

The Four Seasons Room, Mille Lacs Indian Museum
The Four Seasons Room, Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The Trading Post

Moccasins at Trading Post
Moccasins at the Trading Post
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The Trading Post is located next to the museum and offers a large selection of traditional and contemporary American Indian art and crafts from tribes across North America.

The Trading Post offers American Indian art and crafts
The Trading Post offers American Indian art and crafts
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Home to an amazing assortment of artists’ works, the Trading Post’s items include beads, books, blankets, moccasins, birch bark products, paintings, sculptures, pottery, jewelry, dream catchers, and more.

Beads at Trading Post & Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Beads at the Trading Post
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

In addition to the items for sale, an exhibit area can be found just inside the entrance with historical items from the Trading Post and those who have visited over nearly a century.

Postcard from 1964 at Trading Post & Mille Lacs Indian Museum
Postcard from 1964 at Trading Post
Photo: Kim Hull © Chasing Light Media

Know before you go

  • The museum and trading post are located at 43411 Oodena Dr., Onamia, MN 56359
  • Check the museum website for hours and admission fees.
  • Allow at least an hour to tour the museum and visit the trading post.

Disclosure & disclaimer: Special thanks to Explore Minnesota, Mille Lacs Indian Museum and Trading Post, the Minnesota Historical Society and Mille Lacs Area Tourism for hosting us as their guests. The content & opinions expressed are entirely our own. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.

Kim Hull catching her first fish, McQuoid's Inn, Lake Mille Lacs

I caught my first fish with McQuoid’s Inn on Mille Lacs Lake!

Cover: Kim Hull catching her first fish, McQuoid’s Inn, Lake Mille Lacs
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


When I was about 5 or 6 years old my aunt took me fishing. We hauled all the gear out to a small, nearby lake and, upon arrival, she pulled out a can of worms and demonstrated how to put a worm on the hook. There was no possible way I was going to do such a thing, so she did it for me. About 10 minutes later, she explained to me that my constant talking was scaring the fish away. About 10 minutes after that, I’d eaten all of the snacks we’d brought. 10 more minutes – we loaded up the car and, as we headed back to town, she said she didn’t think I was going to be much of a fisherman.

If Eleanor could see me now.

Fishing with McQuoid’s Inn on Mille Lacs Lake

Lake Mille Lacs, Minnesota
Lake Mille Lacs, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

In the land of 10,000 lakes, I think babies are born with fishing poles in their hands, so I’m not sure anyone in Minnesota really believed that I had never caught a fish. But, that was soon to change with the help of McQuoid’s Inn on Mille Lacs Lake.

Kim Hull & Caitlin Rick, Lundeen's Tackle Castle, Lake Mille Lacs
Kim Hull & Caitlin Rick, Lundeen’s Tackle Castle, Lake Mille Lacs
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

After stopping by Lundeen’s Tackle Castle for a fishing license, we headed over to McQuoid’s Inn for an afternoon of fishing on beautiful Lake Mille Lacs.

Heading out to fish with McQuoid's Inn, Lake Mille Lacs
Heading out to fish on Lake Mille Lacs
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

We knew we were going to be in good hands with McQuoid’s Inn, who has offered launch fishing on Mille Lacs Lake for over 70 years. Their boat captains are expert fisherman and McQuoid’s offers both private and public charters on their comfortable and super clean boats. We were joined by a family for the afternoon, and with that, out we headed to fish.

Everything is provided by McQuoid's Inn, Lake Mille Lacs
Everything is provided by McQuoid’s Inn, Lake Mille Lacs
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

No worries with bait, tackle or equipment – everything is provided by McQuoid’s Inn. Our guide and boat captain, Mike, was terrific. He worked hard to find all the best spots where the fish hide and I never once had to touch the bait, which by the way were leeches – the things they used to stick on people to suck their blood under glass cups!

Kim Hull fishing on Lake Mille Lacs with McQuoid's Inn, Lake Mille Lacs
Kim Hull fishing on Lake Mille Lacs
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

We listened to 70’s rock (Eleanor definitely would not have approved) while we waited for the fish to find us – and it didn’t take long!

Fishing with McQuoid's Inn, Lake Mille Lacs
Fishing on Lake Mille Lacs
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The family that was with us caught a couple of Walleye, then I felt a tug on my line. Mike came running with his net and… Voila! I caught a 14″ Walleye!

Kim Hull fishing with Mike Verdeja, McQuoid's Inn, Lake Mille Lacs
Kim Hull fishing with Mike Verdeja, McQuoid’s Inn, Lake Mille Lacs
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Kim Hull & Mike Verdeja, McQuoid's Inn, Lake Mille Lacs, Isle, Minnesota Photo: Greg K. Hull © Chasing Light Media
Mike Verdeja assisting Kim Hull
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

How much fun was that! Mike told me how to hold it – it was rather wiggly – and we snapped the photos.

Kim Hull & Mike Verdeja, McQuoid's Inn, Lake Mille Lacs, Isle, Minnesota Photo: Greg K. Hull © Chasing Light Media
My first catch – A 14″ Walleye
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Walleye is a hugely popular fish in Minnesota and found on menus in nearly every restaurant in the state. We even had it for breakfast in a hash one day (it was amazing). However, for the 2016 season on Lake Mille Lacs, Walleye were classified as “catch and release” to rebuild the population at the lake. So, after Mike measured the little guy, off he went back into the water, and it was back to fishing for this now-experienced fisherwoman.

It wasn’t long before I felt another tug and Mike came running again with the net. This time – a 16″ Small Mouth Bass! With the first fish, in my excitement, I’d forgotten what I’d learned from our resident Minnesotan at lunch – when you take the photo, hold the fish out really far, close to the camera and it makes the fish look bigger.  Got it the second time!

They said to hold it close to the camera - it makes the fish look bigger
They said to hold it close to the camera – it makes the fish look bigger! Kim Hull, McQuoid’s Inn, Lake Mille Lacs, Isle, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Speaking of our resident Minnesotan, Caitlin Rick, who had organized the event, was still fishless as the afternoon was drawing to a close. But, we were doubting too soon and it was as if the fish knew she couldn’t go home without a catch. Just before we turned back to shore, Caitlin too got her catch for the day!

Caitlin Rick & Mike Verdeja, McQuoid's Inn, Lake Mille Lacs, Isle, Minnesota
Caitlin Rick & Mike Verdeja, McQuoid’s Inn, Lake Mille Lacs, Isle, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

What a fun afternoon! If you are in the Mille Lacs Lake area, contact McQuid’s Inn to reserve a spot on one of their charters. The boats are great, the guides are professional and fun, and the lake is beautiful!

Know before you go

  • McQuoid’s Inn provides the bait, tackle, and expert fishing advice.
  • You bring your fishing license, camera, food and beverage, and dress for the weather.
  • Private charters are available for groups of 5 to 85 guests. Bachelor and bachelorette party groups must privately charter launch trips.

Disclosure & Disclaimer: Special thanks to Explore MinnesotaMcQuid’s Inn and Mille Lacs Area Tourism for hosting us as their guests. The content & opinions expressed are entirely our own. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.

Kim Hull, McQuoid's Inn, Lake Mille Lacs, Isle, Minnesota
Kim Hull, McQuoid’s Inn, Lake Mille Lacs, Isle, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
View of Gustavia harbor in St Barths

Can mere mortals visit St Barths? If so, what are some things to do in St Barths once you get there?

Cover: View of Gustavia Harbor in St Barths
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


View our St. Barths photo gallery


There was a period of time when we only went on beach vacations. Our work lives were crazy at the time, so we escaped to an island every couple of months, even if it were only for a few days. Consequently, we visited quite a few sun-kissed spots around the globe, and have continued to do so, even though our travel destinations are now a bit less one-dimensional.

Throughout our journeys to islands located in varying oceans and seas around the world, one has stood the test of time and travels for the top spot on our favorites list – St. Barths. Over the last two decades, we’ve visited the island countless times, from day trips to week-long excursions. We’ve arrived by plane, ferried over by boat, stayed in hotels, rented villas, and watched the sun set while sipping champagne on a boat – ok, it was a small yacht (stay long enough, and these things sometimes happen).

The incredibly beautiful Gouverneur Beach, Saint Barths
The incredibly beautiful Gouverneur Beach, Saint Barths
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Saint-Barthélemy, typically shortened to St. Barts or St. Barths, is, of course, the tiny gem in the Caribbean known for its celebrity visitors and conspicuous consumption. Like the Côte d’Azur, Bora Bora or Aspen, there’s a reason certain places are frequented by those with ample funds seeking a quiet retreat with posh accommodations and a bit of pampering. Extraordinary resorts and villas, stunning natural beauty, fabulous dining and libations, and the best in shopping usually top the “needs” list for these destinations – and are easily fulfilled in St. Barths.

Things to do in St Barths
Things to do in St Barths
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

But, can those not arriving to Gustavia harbor by yacht, still enjoy the 8 square miles of paradise without selling their house in advance to fund the adventure? Yes – it’s still not cheap, but there are a couple of ways to fit it into most travel budgets. Whether you sample the island on a day trip from St. Martin or visit during lower seasons when the hotel rates aren’t quite as outrageous, St. Barths deserves a place on your “where to visit list.”

Sun sets on the Saint Barths yachts
Sun sets on the Saint Barths yachts
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

When to visit St. Barths

As timing is closely linked to prices, your St. Barths’ dollars (yes, they accept U.S. currency) will go quite a bit further at certain times of the year. Of course, there are a few trade-offs for the lower prices – like the possibility of hurricanes.

Fort Oscar, Gustavia Peninsula, St. Barths
Fort Oscar, Gustavia Peninsula, St. Barths
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures @Chasing Light Media

Mid-November to March

The highest season (i.e., costliest) to visit St. Barths is mid-November to March. Most websites will say December, but in the last few years, it seems to be creeping back to mid-November or at least around Thanksgiving. The weather is perfect during this time, St. Barths is a gorgeous alternative to the cold, and the prices are off the charts.

If want to go around December holidays, plan on booking months in advance for hotels and restaurants and you better have a high limit on your credit card. That said, carnival is really fun in St. Barths. The harbor fills with yachts and the entire island shuts down for a parade.

Day trips are a good bet for saving costs during winter months. While prices are high on all islands when it’s snowing in the northern hemisphere, they are exorbitant in St. Barths. A day trip from nearby from St. Maarten can save thousands of dollars and accomplish many of the same activities – just with you sleeping on a different island.

April and May

April to May is a good time to visit – the rain is only occasional and hotel rates start to drop.

June to late November 

Otherwise known in the Caribbean as hurricane season, prices are cheaper, but rain is more likely and your vacation could be interrupted by a hurricane. That said, historically, more hurricanes hit during August to October.

Days of the week

Most shops are closed in Gustavia on Sunday, so if shopping is on your agenda plan accordingly.

Getting to St. Barths

Gustaf III Airport, St. Barths
Gustaf III Airport, St. Barths
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures @Chasing Light Media

Typically, the first step in getting to St. Barths is to get to St. Martin / St. Maarten, which is about 15 miles away. Numerous flights arrive daily to at Princess Juliana airport (airport code: SXM) from the United States, Europe, South America and other Caribbean islands. Once in St. Maarten (the airport is on the Dutch side of the island), there are two primary methods of getting to St. Barths.

Aeroport Gustave III, Saint Barths
Aeroport Gustave III, Saint Barths
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The first is by plane. Small commuter airlines deliver and return passengers daily via the short 10-minute ride between St. Maarten and St. Barths (Airport code: SBH).  A little pricey and a bit precarious, the landing at St. Barths can be an adventure unto itself, as the landing strip is short and requires special training for pilots.  A few commuter flights are also available from Antigua, St. Thomas and San Juan as well.

Plane taking off at St. Jean, St. Barths
Plane taking off at St. Jean, St. Barths
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures @Chasing Light Media

The other option is by water, with the most common being the Great Bay Express ferry that leaves from Philipsburg in St. Maarten. Far more economical, the trip takes about 45 minutes, and you don’t have the added time of security and waiting at the airport.

Great Bay Express Ferry, St Maarten to St Barths
Great Bay Express Ferry, St Maarten to St Barths
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Luggage is no problem – it’s a common method of transportation for travelers between the islands. There are also a few other private charters and smaller ferries running from St. Martin / St. Maarten. For day trippers, the Great Bay Express has an option that leaves in the morning and returns in the evening, providing the option to explore St. Barths without paying the higher hotel rates found on St. Barths.

Luggage is fine on the ferry between St Maareten and Saint Barths
Luggage is fine on the ferry between St. Maarten/St. Martin and Saint Barths
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Upon arrival, whether by plane or boat, passengers must pass through customs. The airport is located at St. Jean and the ferries arrive in Gustavia. Taxis are available at both locations. Car rental locations are located at the airport, so those arriving by ferry and wanting to rent a car, need to cab over to the airport, which is about 5 or 10 minutes away. However, upon your return, most times the rental car company will transport you back to the ferry dock. For those staying on the island, the hotel will typically meet you at your point of arrival and provide transportation to the hotel.

When we first began going to St. Barths, Mini Mokes were prevalent on the island, followed by a period when Smart Cars were all the rage. Now though, everyone primarily gets around by regular cars and scooters.

Things to do in St. Barths

So, for the “Can I really afford St. Barths?” tally – the Great Bay Express is $80 RT from/to St. Maarten per person, a cab from the ferry port to the airport is about $10, and a one day car rental on St. Barths ran us $58 with tax. For our most recent experience, we did a day trip on a Sunday, so many businesses and shops were closed. Many day trippers don’t opt for the car rental – which I think is a mistake, unless you really can’t afford it. The only beach within easy walking distance from Gustavia is Shell Beach, which gets it name for the thousands of tiny shells that cover it. It’s small and nothing to write home about.

With a car, you can explore and, given it’s a tiny island, you can fit quite a bit into your day. Here are a few things that should be on your itinerary for the day….

Bask in the seclusion of Saline Beach

Sign at entrance to Saline beach, St. Barths
Things to do in St Barths: Go to Saline Beach
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures @Chasing Light Media

Saline is a stunningly beautiful, long, undeveloped beach with a laid-back, isolated atmosphere. The beach is deep, with plenty of room to find a spot far enough away from the water to not be bothered by those taking a stroll near the water’s edge.

Climbing over the dunes at the entrance to Saline Beach in St. Barths
Climbing over the dunes at the entrance to Saline Beach in St. Barths
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures @Chasing Light Media

While there is a parking lot at Saline, there are no facilities, so bring water and snacks. From the parking lot, it’s about a five-minute walk up and over the dunes to the beach. Although nudity is technically illegal in St. Barths, topless sunbathing is popular here and full nudity is common, especially on each end of the beach.

Saline beach, St. Barts
Saline Beach, St. Barths
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Languish over a luxurious lunch at St. Jean

St. Jean Beach, St. Barths
Things to do in St. Barths: Lunch at St. Jean Beach
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

After a morning of reading and relaxing on the pristine sands of Saline, you’ll wan to head to St. Jean for a bit of nourishment.

Baie de St. Jean, Saint Barths
Baie de St. Jean, Saint Barths
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

There are a variety of restaurants available in St. Jean, both across the street and along the beach. From pizza and casual fare to restaurants where the cuisine is only rivaled by the view, St. Jean has a fairly good selection of dining choices. We like to slip into French mode when on the island and enjoy a long, luxurious lunch – and decided to splurge on the experience. One of our long-time, go-to spots is Eden Rock.

On the beach at Eden Rock, St. Barths
On the beach at Eden Rock, St. Barths
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures @Chasing Light Media

A beautiful hotel, Eden Rock is perched on a rock overlooking the turquoise waters of St. Jean Bay. Constructed in the 1950’s, Eden Rock was the first hotel built on the island. Over the last 20 years, the hotel acquired adjacent properties and transformed into one of the most luxurious and diverse on the island with a variety of lodging types including standard rooms, cottages, suites, beach houses, and villas.

Sand Bar, Eden Rock, St. Barths
Sand Bar, Eden Rock, St. Barths
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures @Chasing Light Media

We’ve stayed at Eden Rock and it is a beautiful resort in a fabulous location – but on this trip, we just opted for lunch, which set us back $135 + tip for two drinks and two sandwiches. Yep – a little on the insane side of pricing for a fish sandwich. But, we essentially had a few hours at a resort where standard rooms were going for over $1000 per night during the time we visited.

Lunch at Eden Rock, St. Barths
Lunch at Eden Rock, St. Barths
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures @Chasing Light Media

Another beachside dining and drinking option at St. Jean is the famous Nikki Beach. If you plan to go, make reservations ahead of time and anticipate a price tag similar to Eden Rock. If the party scene is your thing, you’ll love it.

Dining, drinking, and watersports at St. Jean, Saint Barths
Dining, drinking, and watersports at St. Jean, Saint Barths
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Take a walk along St. Jean

Things to do in St. Barths: Take a walk along St. Jean Beach
Things to do in St. Barths: Take a walk along St. Jean Beach
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures @Chasing Light Media

All beaches on St. Barths are public and free, so a walk along St. Jean won’t cost you a dime.

Located next to the airport on the Baie de St. Jean, the white sand beach curves around the bay and is home to an array of water activities. Snorkel in the calm waters near the shoreline or head further out for wind-surfing or surfing.

Boat at Eden Rock, Saint Barthélemy
Boat at Eden Rock, Saint Barthélemy
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures @Chasing Light Media

Head over to Gouverneur

Sign at entrance to Gouverneur Beach, St. Barths
Things to do in St. Barths: Go to Gouverneur Beach
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures @Chasing Light Media

After all the activity at St. Jean, it’s good to finish the afternoon with some quiet time on Gouverneur Beach.

Gouverneur Beach, St. Barths
Gouverneur Beach, St. Barths
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures @Chasing Light Media

More remote, Gouverneur is a beautiful, serene beach with amazing views. Like Saline, Gouverneur can be reached by a paved road, has a parking lot, but does not have any facilities, so bring water, an umbrella and anything you wish to eat. Also like Saline, beach goers may opt for that full tan, going au natural.

Gouverneur Beach, Saint Barths
Gouverneur Beach, Saint Barths
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The drive to and from Gouverneur also yields some of the most spectacular views from the island, with a photo opportunity around each turn.

Overlooking Gouverneur Beach, St. Barths
Overlooking Gouverneur Beach, St. Barths
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Throw back a cold one at Le Select

Le Select, Gustavia, St Barths
Le Select, Gustavia, St Barths
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures @Chasing Light Media

After dropping off our car at the airport, they brought us back to Gustavia and we decided to take a stroll around town.

The story has it that Jimmy Buffet, a frequent patron of Le Select back in the 1970’s, cut a deal with the establishment’s owner, Marius Stakelborough. In exchange for rights to use the “Cheeseburger in Paradise” line from Buffet’s famous song, Buffet would have his tab covered at the establishment for life. Over the years, Buffet has returned to the corner where thousands have downed a beer and burger, for an impromptu concert or an anniversary party at the bar on the quay, which has been in operation over 60 years. A great spot for people watching and enjoying a cool drink under the shade trees, Le Select is open Monday – Saturday.

Shopping in Gustavia

Shopping in St. Barths
Shopping in St. Barths
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures @Chasing Light Media

A duty-free port, Gustavia is home to over 200 boutiques that line three streets in the quant village. While the names of luxury retailers range from Louis Vuitton and Bulgari to Cartier, Hermès and Chopard, many small shops offering beachwear, accessories, and t-shirts can be found as well. The shops are typically closed from noon to three but open again in the late afternoon until 7pm. Most high-end retailers are also closed on Sunday, but a few of the stores offering casual wear and t-shirt open in the late Sunday afternoon hours.

Saint Barths shopping
Saint Barths shopping
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Grab a drink and watch the sun set over the harbor

Saint Barths sunset
Saint Barths sunset
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

There are quite a few fabulous places to watch the sun set while on St. Barths, but we are always a fan of grabbing a cocktail and watching the boats return to the harbor as the sky fills with amazing hues of orange and purple.

Sunset, Gustavia Harbor, St. Barths
Sunset, Gustavia Harbor, St. Barths
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures @Chasing Light Media

For those leaving the island, the ferry returns at dusk to whisk you back to St. Maarten. For those staying on, the island changes after sunset. The day trippers leave, the stores close and a quiet settles over the island as visitors enjoy casually elegant dinners, before retiring to their hotel or villa or opting for a little nightlife at one of the late night cocktail bars.

Harbor Station, Saint Barths
Harbor Station, Saint Barths
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

How much did that day in St. Barths cost?

Let’s tally up our one day in St. Barths. Even with our splurge lunch, we spent just over $400 for the two of us. If we had opted for a not-on-the beach pizza for lunch, we could have easily cut it to $300. On the other hand, as it was high-season, if we had stayed on the island even one night, it would have run well over $1000. So, for us, an enjoyable day on one of our favorite islands for a couple of hundred bucks a piece was well worth it.


Disclosure & Disclaimer: The content & opinions expressed are entirely our own. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.

St Barths Harbor sunset
St Barths Harbor sunset
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures @Chasing Light Media
A Brainerd Zip Line high flying adventure

A Brainerd Zip Line high flying adventure

Cover: A Brainerd Zip Line high-flying adventure
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


Ready for some high-flying fun in the Brainerd Lakes area? Head over to Brainerd Zip Line at Mount Ski Gull for a few hours of soaring over the treetops while enjoying spectacular views of Gull Lake!

We’d wanted to try ziplining for years, so when Explore Minnesota presented the opportunity to try out the newly built zip line course presented itself, we were all in – and it was a blast!

Greg Hull, Zip Line Brainerd
Greg Hull, Zip Line Brainerd
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Gearing up

Caitlin Rick gearing up at Brainerd Zip Line Tour, Brainerd Lakes, Minnesota
Caitlin Rick gearing up at Brainerd Zip Line Tour, Brainerd Lakes, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

After signing waivers, we headed out to gear up. Gear is provided by Brainerd Zip Line Tour and includes harnesses, gloves, and a helmet.

Gear is provided by Brainerd Zip Line Tour
Gear is provided by Brainerd Zip Line Tour, Brainerd Lakes, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

After getting into our harnesses and helmets, we selected gloves, which are for braking along the line. Ready to go, we boarded a van and headed to the training course.

Boarding the van to go ziplining at Brainerd Zip Line Tour
Boarding the van to go ziplining at Zip Line Brainerd
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The guides

Amanda & Hollie, Brainerd Zip Line Tour, Brainerd Lakes, Minnesota
Amanda & Hollie, Zip Line Brainerd
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Each group has two guides – ours were Hollie and Amanda, who were professional and, it was obvious throughout our adventure, they had been well-trained to have our safety in mind.

Our guide, Amanda, with Greg at Zip Line Brainerd
Our guide, Amanda, with Greg at Zip Line Brainerd
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Hollie and Amanda helped us gear up and taught us ziplining basics at a training course site. Once we were trained, they sent and caught us, as we moved from tower to tower along the zip line course.

Caitlin Rick and Amanda, Brainerd Zip Line Tour
Caitlin Rick and Amanda, Zip Line Tour, Brainerd Lakes, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

They also were a lot of fun and shared facts about the area and the course throughout the experience.

Kim Hull and Amanda at Brainerd Zip Line Tour, Brainerd Lakes, Minnesota
Kim Hull and Amanda at Zip Line Tour, Brainerd Lakes, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Zipline training

Amanda demonstrating on the training course at Brainerd Zip Line Tour
Amanda demonstrating on the training course at Zip Line Tour, Brainerd Lakes, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

For anyone that would have any anxiety before ziplining, the training course sets those fears to rest. Amanda and Hollie first explained the basics, like how to hold on and how to brake, and answered any of our questions. Amanda then demonstrated how to zip line.

Next up, we each gave it a try. Low to the ground, the training zip line gives everyone a chance to try out their new skills before encountering heights. Amanda and Hollie took time to make sure everyone was comfortable before moving on.

Caitlin Rick on the training course at Brainerd Zip Line Tour
Caitlin Rick on the training course at Zip Line Brainerd
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Training completed, we walked a short distance to the zip lines. Arriving at the course, we climbed up a five-story flight of stairs to the first tower. The reward for the climb – aside from getting to begin your zip line adventure – are the views. From the tower, you can see for miles across Agate Lake and Gull Lake.

View of Agate Lake and Gull Lake from Brainerd Zip Line Tour tower
View of Agate Lake and Gull Lake from Brainerd Zip Line Tour tower
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Let’s go ziplining!

The Brainerd Zip Line Tour course consists of 7 lines of varying lengths, a 65-foot suspension bridge, and an optional 50-foot free fall jump. Everyone is clipped in during the experience – even while waiting on the towers. Getting things started, Hollie went first to be on the receiving end tower at the end of the line. From there, she guided us as we approached on when to begin braking and was there to catch us and assist with our landing.

Hollie, Brainerd Zip Line Tour, Brainerd Lakes, Minnesota
Hollie, Zip Line Brainerd
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Now it was our turn. Amanda secured us, communicated with Hollie on the other side via radio, and when we were clear – away we went! As with repelling when rock climbing, the first step off is the most difficult and then, it is just a blast.

Greg Hull takes off of tower one at Zip Line Brainerd
Greg Hull takes off of tower one at Zip Line Brainerd
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

So, what’s it like zipping along above the trees? Check it out…

Navigating the suspension bridge

Caitlin Rick navigating the suspension bridge, Brainerd Zip Line Tour
Caitlin Rick navigating the suspension bridge, Zip Line Brainerd
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

In addition to the seven zip lines, the Brainerd Zip Line Tour includes a trek across a 65-foot long suspension bridge. Even though it sounds easy, the boards get further apart near the uphill finish, making it a bit challenging – although I did manage to pose for a photo opp…

Kim Hull on the suspension bridge, Brainerd Zip Line Tour, Brainerd Lakes, Minnesota
Kim Hull on the suspension bridge, Zip Line Brainerd
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

A 50-foot free fall finale

As our zip line adventure drew to a close, there was just one more thing to do – the optional 50 foot free fall jump!

Caitlin Rick in free fall at Zip Line Brainerd
Caitlin Rick in free fall at Zip Line Brainerd
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

After arriving at the last tower, there are two ways down. Walk down the stairs or opt for a 50-foot free fall finale. Of course, we jumped. Not a bungee jump, it’s a controlled free fall and a great way to end a fabulous zip line adventure!

Kim Hull doing the free fall jump at Brainerd Zip Line Tour
Kim Hull landing at the free fall jump at Zip Line Brainerd
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Know before you go

Dress for the adventure. Unless lightning or high winds are present, zip line tours are conducted regardless of weather conditions, including rain and snow. Given you will be zipping through the air above the tree line, dress appropriately. Additionally, closed toe and heel shoes and shirts are required. Long pants are recommended because the safety harness straps can irritate your skin. Hair should be tied back.

Mosquito repellent. Even though you don’t think about mosquitos when soaring above the trees, in the training area there were mosquitos, so put on some repellant before going to the mountain.

Age and weight restrictions. Brainerd Zip Line Tour participants must be between 70 and 250 pounds and 10 years old or older.

Photography. While we were allowed to bring our cameras during the experience for this article, guests are not allowed to bring cameras with the exception of a GoPro (which we also used) with a helmet mount, which Brainerd Zip Lines provides. If you do not have a GoPro, Brainerd Zip Lines rents units for $20.

Time. Arrive at least 30 minutes before your reserved time and allow 2 to 2/12 hours for your zip line adventure.

Wait until after your adventure for a beer.

Reservations are recommended. Find out more and reserve your spot for a Brainerd Zip Line Tour on their website.


Disclosure & disclaimer: Special thanks to Explore Minnesota, Explore Brainerd Lakes and Brainerd Zip Line Tour for hosting us as their guests. The content & opinions expressed are entirely our own. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.

Water tower at entrance of Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery, Sonoma County, California

Martin Ray Winery

Cover: Water tower at entrance of Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery, Sonoma County, California
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


Driving up Laguna Road toward Martin Ray Winery, the first thing you’ll notice is a water tower soaring high above the vines against a perfect Sonoma sky. As you turn down the long drive, vibrant flowers and olive trees welcome you to the beautiful, historic winery just west of Santa Rosa.

Flowers & olive trees welcome you to Martin Ray Winery
Flowers & olive trees welcome you to Martin Ray Winery, Sonoma County, California
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

While we’d tasted Martin Ray’s wines over the years, this was our first visit to the winery and we quickly realized we’d uncovered a gem. Serene and lavishly landscaped, the winery is one of those where you grab a glass, find a chair near the vines or a table next to the gardens, and casually enjoy the wine country experience.

Relax in a chair near the vines at Martin Ray Winery
Relax in a chair near the vines
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

We visited on a Saturday afternoon during Grill 116, a tasting event hosted by 12 wineries along Route 116 in West Sonoma County where attendees sampled their way through wines and grilled specialties along the route.

Grill 116 event at Martin Ray, Sonoma County, California
Grill 116 event at Martin Ray 
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Tasting at Grill 116 at Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery, Santa Rosa
Tasting at Grill 116 at Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

As visitors meandered about, enjoying the food, wines and a glorious Sonoma afternoon, we caught up with Andy Barker, Director of Consumer Sales & Hospitality, who gave us a tour and shared a bit of the winery’s history along the way – and quite a history it does have.

Kim Hull & Andy Barker, Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery, Santa Rosa, California
Kim Hull & Andy Barker, Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The oldest continually operating winery in Sonoma County

Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery, Sonoma County, California
Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery, Sonoma County, California
Photo: Kim Hull © Chasing Light Media

Oh, the stories the vineyards surrounding the winery could tell. Martin Ray is the oldest continuously operating winery in Sonoma County and one of the oldest in all of California.

Back in 1881, Twin Fir Winery set up a vineyard and winery on this spot in the Russian River Valley of Sonoma County. In 1902, an Italian immigrant, Rafael Martini, purchased the winery and, in the years following, Martini further developed the estate, building a stable and bunk house where Italian immigrants stayed during harvest. Today, the Martin Ray Tasting Room is housed in this very structure.

Martin Ray Tasting Room, Santa Rosa, California
Martin Ray Tasting Room
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Tanks were crafted from old-growth redwood in 1904 and, soon thereafter, Martini turned the operations over to his sons. The Martinis produced wines that put the winery on the map. Enduring prohibition by producing sacramental wines, the winery survived and the Martinis resumed making wines for the public after it was repealed in 1933.

Old-growth redwood tanks at Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery, Santa Rosa, California
Old-growth redwood tanks at Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

In 1950, Enrico Prati joined the Martini family, and the new Martini & Prati label produced wines at the location until the winery was sold to Courtney Benham in 2003.

Martin Ray Winery, Santa Rosa, California
Martin Ray Winery, Santa Rosa, California
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Courtney Benham brings Martin Ray Wines to Sonoma County

One of the reasons I love visiting a winery is hearing the history of the vineyard, the winemakers and the winery while walking the grounds and tasting the wine. Somehow, from then on, when the wine fills your glass, the provenance, the terroir, and the winery visit converge in your glass along with the juice, bringing the wine country experience to you as you taste the wine, wherever you may be in the world.

2014 Martin Ray Winery Pinot Noir Photo: Kim Hull © Chasing Light Media
2014 Martin Ray Winery Pinot Noir
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

By the time Courtney Benham acquired the Martini & Prati location in 2003, the winery had seen better days and was on the decline. Benham, who had acquired the rights to the Martin Ray brand in 1990, purchased the Martini & Prati vineyards and winery in 2003 and set about renovating the property, bringing it to modern standards, while still embracing its history and tradition.

Today, the winery is a great example of form and function coexisting. The beautiful barrel room serves as a stunning backdrop to parties and events but, when harvest rolls around, the tables are cleared out and the room is used as a production facility.

Beautiful Martin Ray barrel room serves as a stunning backdrop to parties and events Photo: Greg K. Hull © Chasing Light Media
Beautiful Martin Ray barrel room serves as a stunning backdrop to parties and events
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

State of the art storage facilities are housed in buildings that once were home to over 1.5 million gallons of the old redwood storage tanks. Utilizing a variety of production equipment and fermentation methods, the Martin Ray winemakers have at their disposal the tools required to produce the award-winning, artisanal wines for which they are known and respected.

Martin Ray production facilities Photo: Greg K. Hull © Chasing Light Media
Martin Ray production facilities
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Barrel room at Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery, Santa Rosa, California
Barrel room at Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery, Santa Rosa, California
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Leaving the barrel rooms and production facilities, we wandered over to the serene setting of the pavilion located under the water tower, which is available for corporate retreats and also used for winery events, such as wine under the stars evenings.

Event pavilion at Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery, Sonoma County, California
Event pavilion at Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Lush landscaping at Martin Ray Winery, Sonoma County, California
Lush landscaping at Martin Ray Winery
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Speaking of wine, it was time to do some more tasting – next stop, the tasting room.

Yield to tasters, Martin Ray Winery, Sonoma County, California
Yield to tasters, Martin Ray Winery
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The Martin Ray tasting room

Tasting room at Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery
Tasting room at Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Welcomed by a knowledgeable and friendly staff, the low-key tasting room is just what you’d expect in such an inviting atmosphere.

Martin Ray's casual tasting room
Martin Ray’s casual tasting room
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Martin Ray Wines

We’d tasted the Russian River Valley Chardonnay & Rosé during our tour and we really liked both wines and decided to also try/take home a few of the limited release wines. For our chardonnay choice, we selected the 2014 Mill Station Vineyard-Dutton Ranch Chardonnay from Green Valley.

While I’m generally not a chardonnay fan, Greg is, so we try to find chardonnays that appeal to both our tastes. This one fit the bill, refreshing and not too oaky, with a richness and clean finish. As far as the rosé – we’d loved the 2015 Estate Grown Rosé. Bone dry, complex, crisp – just a perfect summer wine.

Next up, the 2013 Puccioni Vineyard Dry Creek Zinfandel. Robust with an earthy tone and nicely balanced. Liked it, and in the box it went.

Martin Ray 2013 Puccioni Vineyard Dry Creek Zinfandel
Martin Ray 2013 Puccioni Vineyard Dry Creek Zinfandel
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Time to get serious, we moved on to the 2013 Martin Ray Atlas Peak Cabernet Sauvignon from Napa Valley. A truly special wine, the Cab was full bodied, rich and simply divine. This one was a definite purchase and probably will make an appearance around the holidays.

Martin Ray 2013 Martin Ray Atlas Peak Cabernet Sauvignon from Napa Valley
Martin Ray 2013 Martin Ray Atlas Peak Cabernet Sauvignon from Napa Valley
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Martin Ray 2007 Diamond Peak District Cabernet Sauvignon
Martin Ray 2007 Diamond Peak District Cabernet Sauvignon
Photo: Ryan Hull © Chasing Light Media

Martin Ray has a small quantity of older vintages available in their library collection. Highly-praised by fans and pros alike, you can also find Martin Ray wines on many quality restaurant wine lists.

Certified Sommelier and general manager of Boulder, Colorado’s L’Atelier, Ryan Hull explains why he regularly features Martin Ray wines in the restaurant:

Martin Ray was legendary…one of the first to bring the French philosophies of wine making and vineyard management to California. The proof is in the pudding. This is apparent from the juice in the glass.

I was recently pouring the 2007 Diamond Mountain District Cabernet Sauvignon by the glass and nearly every customer opted for a second. Amazing vintage, incredible complexity and luscious fruit.”

– Ryan Hull, CS & GM, L’Atelier

Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery, Santa Rosa, California
Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery, Santa Rosa, California
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Visiting Martin Ray

Getting there: Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery is located on the quieter side of the 101, about 10 miles west of downtown Santa Rosa. The address is 2191 Laguna Road, Santa Rosa, California 95401.

Hours: The tasting room is open daily from 10am to 5pm.

Book a tour or reserve a box lunch in advance. The winery welcomes visitors to pack a picnic and enjoy the beautiful gardens while having lunch or, call two days in advance to order a box lunch for your visit. A variety of tours and tastings are available and can be reserved on the Martin Ray website.


Disclosure & disclaimer: Special thanks to Martin Ray Vineyards and Winery for hosting us as their guests. The content & opinions expressed are entirely our own. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.

Martin Ray water tower, Santa Rosa, California
Martin Ray water tower, Santa Rosa, California
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Warm welcome aboard Destiny Cruises, Gull Lake, Brainerd Minnesota

Enjoying beautiful Gull Lake aboard Destiny Cruises in Brainerd Minnesota

Cover: Captivating views aboard Destiny Cruises, Gull Lake, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


A couple of hours gliding on clear waters, while enjoying delicious food and a beverage under clear blue skies, makes for one of our favorite ways to spend an afternoon.

When the lake is Gull Lake, one of the largest in the Brainerd, Minnesota area, with 38 miles of picturesque coastline and sparkling waters, and the boat it is the luxury Destiny Cruises yacht, the North Star, the experience is elevated to a superb afternoon of relaxation and leisure.

The beautiful Gull Lake coastline, Brainerd, Minnesota
The beautiful Gull Lake coastline, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Destiny Cruises on Gull Lake

The North Star, Destiny Cruises, Gull Lake, Brainerd, Minnesota
The North Star, Destiny Cruises, Gull Lake, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Our two-hour lunch excursion aboard the beautiful motor yacht began at the docks at Ernie’s on Gull, about six miles north of Brainerd. Welcomed aboard with a warm, Minnesota welcome, guests have the option of relaxing downstairs in the air-conditioned, glass-enclosed cabin, or opting for the open-air upstairs deck. We headed straight upstairs to bask in the Minnesota sunshine.

Warm welcome aboard Destiny Cruises, Gull Lake, Brainerd Minnesota
Warm welcome aboard Destiny Cruises, Gull Lake, Brainerd Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The yacht is large – 65 feet long and 22 feet wide – providing guests plenty of room to spread out, get comfortable and enjoy the captivating views.

Custom built by SkipperLiner in LaCrosse, WI for Destiny Cruises, the North Star took a year to build and was delivered in 2014. Now in her third season on Gull Lake, the North Star was the first public cruise vessel to operate on the lake for many years. The elegant boat’s public cruises, which include lunch, brunch, happy hour, dinner and sunset cruises, have been warmly welcomed by the community and visitors to the area. The yacht is also a popular venue for private chartered events and weddings.

Cash bar on the North Star, Gull Lake, Minnesota
Cash bar on the North Star, Gull Lake, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

With two cash bars, one upstairs and one down, guests can partake of a beverage, as we did, selecting a refreshing cocktail to enjoy as we pulled away from the dock and headed out on the sparkling waters of Gull Lake.

Enjoying beverages before lunch, Kim Hull, Caitlin Rick, Destiny Cruises, Gull Lake, Minnesota
Enjoying beverages before lunch, Kim Hull, Caitlin Rick, Destiny Cruises, Gull Lake, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

One of the largest lakes in the Brainerd area, Gull Lake is three miles wide and fifteen miles long. Along the way, our captain provided some of the area’s history and facts about the lake itself. Gull Lake is 70 – 85 feet deep in most places and contains most types of fish common to Minnesota’s waters.

Our cruise aboard Destiny Cruise was entertaining & informational
Our cruise aboard Destiny Cruise was entertaining & informational
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

As the relaxation and fun continued, we took turns “diving the boat” and I even donned the captain’s cap while at the helm.

Kim Hull driving the boat, Destiny Cruises, Gull Lake, Minnesota
Kim Hull driving the North Star
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Lunch was a delicious selection of BBQ chicken and salmon, baked beans, cole slaw, potato salad and turtle pudding for dessert.

Dining aboard the North Star, Destiny Cruises, Brainerd, Minnesota
Dining aboard the North Star, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

We made our way around the lake, passing Hole in the Day Bay, where an ice fishing championship is held each winter with 20,000 pre-drilled holes created in advance for the competition. On this warm, sunny day as the lake sparkled in a thousand shades of blue, it was hard to imagine it being cold enough for ice fishing a few months earlier. The magic of Minnesota.

View of Madden's Resort from Gull Lake, Brainerd, Minnesota
View of Madden’s Resort from Gull Lake, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

There are 19 resorts on Gull Lake, including Madden’s, where we stayed while visiting the Brainerd area, and which we highly recommend. A beautiful, sprawling resort, Madden’s has five restaurants, four pools, two lounges, three golf courses, spa, full-service marina and so much more. If you are staying at Madden’s and would like to schedule a private Destiny Cruise for your group, Destiny Cruise can even pick you up at the resort.

Madden's Resort on Gull Lake, Brainerd, Minnesota
Madden’s Resort on Gull Lake, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

As our wonderful time aboard the North Star drew to a close, we savored the last moments of peaceful relaxation and stunning views on Gull Lake.  The entire two-hour cruise was perfect thanks to the beautiful surroundings, the large, elegant yacht, and the excellent crew.

Kim and Greg Hull, Destiny Cruises
Kim and Greg Hull, Destiny Cruises, Gull Lake, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Caitlin Rick

Know before you go

Prepare for changing weather. Except when severe weather conditions are present, cruises depart rain or shine. Wear sunscreen and a hat, and bring a light jacket, especially in the evening or on a cloudy day.

Cruises. Destiny Cruises offers public brunch, lunch, happy hour, dinner and sunset cruises. Private charters for events such as weddings, rehearsal dinners, family gatherings or corporate getaways are also available. Visit the Destiny Cruises website for more information and to book your cruise or private event.

Bring some cash. The crew provides excellent service and gratuity for the onboard staff is not included in the ticket price.


Disclosure & disclaimer: Special thanks to Explore Minnesota, Explore Brainerd Lakes and Destiny Cruises for hosting us as their guests. The content & opinions expressed are entirely our own. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.

Paul Bunyan, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota

Paul Bunyan Land, home to a 26 foot tall talking lumberjack

Cover: Paul Bunyan, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


Paul Bunyan knows your name!

As you enter Paul Bunyan Land, the famous lumberjack sits directly in front of you, 26 feet tall with eyes that blink and a head that swivels, and he greets you by name. After that, he answers any questions you may have.

We had a few – check out Paul telling us how old he is and what his favorite food is…


Paul went on to tell us about how his dog, Sport, the Reversible Dog, who ended up with his legs upside down. Evidently, Sport accidentally got cut in half and when the nearby doctor sewed him back together he made the mistake. Now sport runs on his front legs, then flops over and runs on his hind legs when he gets tired.

Sport, the Reversible Dog, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Sport, the Reversible Dog, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull © Chasing Light Media

As much as we loved it, children are mesmerized. Watching from a short distance, nostalgia is in the air as parents and grandparents relive their own childhood memories with the plaid-shirted animated giant.

Babe the Blue Ox, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Babe the Blue Ox, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull © Chasing Light Media

A local attraction and tradition in the Brainerd Lakes Area since the 1950s, Paul and his friends’ futures were looking bleak when the original amusement park, Paul Bunyan Amusement Center, closed in 2002 to make way for a Kohl’s department store. Hoping to obtain a few items from the park as it was sold off, the owners of Pioneer Village, located about 6 miles away, ended up purchasing the entire amusement park. Combining the two attractions, they relocated the rides, buildings, Paul, Sport, and Paul’s ox, Babe the Blue Ox, to their new home on 23 acres, which is now Paul Bunyan Land and This Old Farm Pioneer Village.

Kim Hull at Paul's mailbox, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Kim Hull at Paul’s mailbox, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull © Chasing Light Media

The park now has something for everyone, offering a day of fun and exploration for the entire family. Paul Bunyan Land has 40 rides and attractions, a petting barn, and the Pioneer Village is home to 30 buildings filled with the largest one man collection of antiques from the late 1800’s to early 1900’s in Minnesota.

The amusement park

Flight Commander amusement ride, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Flight Commander amusement ride, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull © Chasing Light Media

With 40 amusement rides and attractions, the kiddos will be entertained all day – and they can be because all rides are included in the admission price.

There are rides like the Flight Commander and Mini Roller Coaster for the little ones.

Mini roller coaster amusement ride, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Mini roller coaster amusement ride, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull © Chasing Light Media

For the older family members, the Tilt-A-Whirl, Dodge-em-Cars and Flying Cages provide whirls and thrills. And, for everyone in the family, climb on the ferris wheel or explore the Magnetic Mine.

Magnetic Mine Shack, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Magnetic Mine Shack, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull © Chasing Light Media
Carousel at Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Carousel at Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull © Chasing Light Media

In addition to the amusement park, Paul Bunyan Land has a candy store and jail, which are conveniently, oh I mean curiously, next door to each other.

Kim Hull, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Kim Hull, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull © Chasing Light Media

Paul’s petting barn

Paul's Petting Barn, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Paul’s Petting Barn, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull © Chasing Light Media

Paul’s petting barn is between the amusement park and the Pioneer Village and a chance to stop by and see the horses, chickens and pigs up close.

Hog at Paul's Petting Barn, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Hog at Paul’s Petting Barn, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull © Chasing Light Media

This Old Farm Pioneer Village

Longhorn Saloon, Pioneer Village, Brainerd, Minnesota
Longhorn Saloon, Pioneer Village, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull © Chasing Light Media

Thirty buildings await exploration in The Pioneer Village, including a train depot, blacksmith, saw mill, fire station, church, sweet shoppe, log house, fire station and many more.

Each of the buildings are filled with antiques primarily from the collection of Dick and Marian Rademacher, who started the Village, and from other donors who wanted to see their collections enjoyed by the many visitors to the park.

Rad's Groceries building exterior, Pioneer Village, Brainerd, Minnesota
Rad’s Groceries building exterior, Pioneer Village, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull © Chasing Light Media

Great care in preserving history is visible throughout Pioneer Village. The Rad’s Groceries building was the actual structure of the store operated about six miles away by Rademacher’s parents. The building was moved from its original location to the Village and then filled with period pieces from the Rademacher antique collection.

Rad's Groceries building interior, Pioneer Village, Brainerd, Minnesota
Rad’s Groceries building interior, Pioneer Village, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull © Chasing Light Media

The train depot building was actually used in the making of the 1994 movie Iron Will starring Mackenzie Astin and Kevin Spacey. Following the movie, the structure was moved to Brainerd and re-constructed in the Pioneer Village.

The Depot from the movie Iron Will, Pioneer Village, Brainerd, Minnesota
The Depot from the movie Iron Will, Pioneer Village, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull © Chasing Light Media

Current owners, Lois Moon and Alan Rademacher, work to preserve the massive collection their father built over the years and to share it with the many park visitors. The collection is vast, with thousands and thousands of items ranging from glassware to antique cars to farm equipment.

Miniature train, Pioneer Village, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Miniature train, Pioneer Village, Paul Bunyan Land, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull © Chasing Light Media
Pequot Lakes Fire Dept truck, Pioneer Village, Brainerd, Minnesota
Pequot Lakes Fire Dept truck, Pioneer Village, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull © Chasing Light Media

Donations of items, such as a huge camera collection and the cannon shown below, have made their way to Pioneer Village, with the understanding that, once donated, the items will stay in the Village permanently.

Cannon donated by Andy Swift, Pioneer Village, Brainerd, Minnesota
Cannon donated by Andy Swift, Pioneer Village, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull © Chasing Light Media
Antique Car Collection, Pioneer Village, Brainerd, Minnesota
Antique Car Collection, Pioneer Village, Brainerd, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull © Chasing Light Media

Where to stay

There are a variety of lodging choices in and around Brainerd, but we recommend Madden’s on Gull Lake. A beautiful, luxury resort, Madden’s has stunning water views, two golf courses, a spa, fabulous dining, a beach and so much more.

Know before you go

Admissions. Here’s one parents should love. Admission includes unlimited rides for the day, and entry to the petting barn and Pioneer Village. Season passes are also available and children under 2 are free.

Park hours. The park is open daily 10 am to 6 pm from Memorial Day Weekend to Labor Day. Additionally, the park operates Brainerd Lakes’ largest haunted attraction in October and free admission to the  Enchanted Holiday Pioneer Village during the holiday season in December. Visit the Paul Bunyan Land website for hours and dates.

Attire & height requirements and other policies can be found on the Paul Bunyan Land website.


Disclosure & Disclaimer: Special thanks to Explore Minnesota, Explore Brainerd Lakes and Paul Bunyan Land for hosting us as their guests. The content & opinions expressed are entirely our own. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used. Some posts on this website may contain links to our partners’ websites and Chasing Light Media may be compensated by those partners.

Mayor James Tufts & Former Mayor Bobby Tufts, Dorset, Minnesota

Dorset Minnesota: Home of America’s youngest mayor & the “Restaurant Capital of the World”

Cover: Dorset, Minnesota’s Mayor James Tufts & Former Mayor Bobby Tufts
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


It’s not every day that you visit a town and, upon arriving, the mayor and the former mayor meet you and take you on a tour. But then, not every town is Dorset, Minnesota.

There’s a lot happening in this unique little town in north central Minnesota with a population of 22. The self-proclaimed “Restaurant Capital of the World,” Dorset has a newspaper that is published once a year “whether there’s unbelievable news or not” and has elected a three-year old mayor – twice.

The Youngest Mayor in America

Mayor James Tuft, Dorset, Minnesota
Mayor James Tuft, Dorset, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

When James Tufts became mayor of Dorset in 2015 at the age of three, he stole the record as Dorset’s youngest mayor from his older brother. Two-term former mayor, Robert “Bobby” Tufts, was also elected at the age of three but, with his win, James edged him out as the youngest by two days.

How did a three-year old become mayor, you may ask? In unincorporated Dorset, the mayor is drawn from the ballots cast during the annual Taste of Dorset festival. It’s a buck a ballot and anyone can enter their selection during the process, with the proceeds going to charity.

During their time in office, the Tufts brothers have gained international fame, appearing on the Today Show and Good Morning America and having made headlines in the NY Daily News, the Daily Mirror and countless other news outlets.

Mayor James Tufts, Kim Hull, Caitlin Rick, Dorset, Minnesota
Mayor James Tufts, Kim Hull, Caitlin Rick, Dorset, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

After a tour through several of James’ favorite haunts around town, such as the toy section of a local store and the miniature golf course, we stopped to catch some words of wisdom from the pint-sized politician who is quick to dispense sage advice.

And, it appears we are in good company – well, at least famous company. According to the local paper, the Dorset Daily Bugle, all of the presidential candidates have sought the mayor’s advice. James, now at the wise old age of four, provided these words of wisdom, “Be nice and no poopy talk.”

Dorset Daily Bugle, Dorset, Minnesota
Dorset Daily Bugle, Dorset, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Older brother Bobby, now a Dorset ambassador, seems happy to assist his younger sibling with his mayoral duties. But, if you think he’s completely retired from politics, you may want to think otherwise. It appears from his hat he’s already exploring a 2048 presidential bid.

Finishing up our time with the Tuft political dynasty, we moved on to investigate Dorset’s other claim to fame as the Restaurant Capital of the World.

Former Mayor Bobby Tufts, Mayor James Tufts, Kim Hull, Dorset, Minnesota
Former Mayor Bobby Tufts, Mayor James Tufts, Kim Hull, Dorset, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The Restaurant Capital of the World

Dorset, Minnesota restaurants
Dorset, Minnesota restaurants
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

With five restaurants serving the 22 residents of Dorset, it does seem the tiny town is worthy of the title of Restaurant Capital of the World.

This actually follows a two-year period when the town was down to only three restaurants. In September 2014, Campaneros and the Dorset House were destroyed by fire after being struck by lightning. Both restaurants were rebuilt and reopened in 2016, restoring the town’s assortment of dining options to five. While in town, we dined at La Pasta, which in addition to a wide selection of Italian delicacies, has ridiculously good breadsticks.

Trading Post, Dorset, Minnesota
Trading Post, Dorset, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Obviously, most visitors come to the Restaurant Capital of the World to eat but, when visiting, be sure to allow some time in your schedule for shopping as well.

Shopping in quaint Dorset, Minnesota
Shopping in quaint Dorset, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

A stroll down Dorset’s main street is a must and will undoubtedly result in a few finds that must make their way home with you. From souvenirs, to home decor to antiques to yes, James’ favorite, candy and toys await.

Dorset, Minnesota shops
Dorset, Minnesota shops
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Shopping in Dorset, Minnesota
Shopping in Dorset, Minnesota
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Things to do near Dorset

Shop Downtown Park Rapids. Only 6 miles from Dorset, Park Rapids has a charming downtown area with numerous shops, boutiques, and restaurants.

Cross the headwaters of the Mississippi at Itasca State ParkItasca State Park is home to the beginning of the Mississippi River, as well as 32,000 acres of towering pines, more than 100 lakes, hiking and biking trails, the largest pine tree in Minnesota, the historic Douglas Lodge and much more.

Visit Detroit Lakes. Only about an hour away from Dorset, Detroit Lakes is has a wide variety of outdoor activities, events, festivals, shopping, and dining.

Dorset, Minnesota
Dorset, Minnesota
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

We loved visiting Dorset and applaud the 22 residents and the nearby town of Park Rapids for their creativity in promoting this unique little place on the planet. Thank you to everyone who came out to meet us, to La Pasta for hosting us for lunch, and to James and Bobby for our tour of the town.


Disclosure & disclaimer: Special thanks to Explore Minnesota and the Park Rapids Chamber of Commerce for hosting us as their guests. The content & opinions expressed are entirely our own. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.

CityPASS New York

New York CityPASS: The best attractions at a great price

Cover: New York CityPASS and the Statue of Liberty
Photo: Greg K.  Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


New York is an amazing city.

While there are a vast amount of things to do in New York City, there are certain attractions that really need to be experienced every so often by anyone visiting New York. Lady Liberty. The 9/11 Memorial. The Met. They’re iconic. They’re historic. They’re so New York.

As with everything in the Big Apple, they can be expensive to visit. The solution: New York CityPASS, offering discounts to the most visited attractions in the city.

New York CityPASS attraction: Metropolitan Museum of Art
CityPass attraction in New York City: Metropolitan Museum of Art Great Hall
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Save with New York CityPASS

New York CityPASS can really save you a lot of money and, in some locations, quite a bit of time. The CityPASS attractions include:

  • Empire State Building Experience  – Adult 86th floor admission $32 + late night re-entry (re-entry package not priced by Empire State Building Experience – CityPASS places a total value of ticket at $47)
  • American Museum of Natural History – Adult Plus 1 package admission $27
  • Metropolitan Museum of Art – Adult admission $25
  • Choice of Top of the Rock Observation Deck – Adult admission $32 or the Guggenheim Museum – Adult admission $25
  • Choice of Statue of Liberty & Ellis Island – Adult admission $18 or Circle Line Sightseeing Cruises – Adult admission $37
  • Choice of Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum – Adult admission $24 or 9/11 Memorial Museum – Adult admission $24

For the optional tickets, we selected Top of The Rock Observation Deck, Statue of Liberty & Ellis Island, and Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum, which placed a value of the attractions admissions we visited in New York City at $173.

With New York CityPASS priced at $116 – that’s a 33% savings from purchasing the tickets individually from the attractions. Making CityPASS even more enticing, at some locations you speed through the fast lane, bypassing the general admission line. The result – you save time and money.

New York CityPASS Attractions

Empire State Building Experience

New York CityPASS attraction: Empire State Building
CityPASS attraction: Empire State Building
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The Empire State Building Experience is a chance to step into history while enjoying 360° unobstructed views of New York City and beyond.

With CityPASS, visit during the 86th-floor observatory during the day, then return for a late night view as the city sparkles against the night sky (May-August between 10pm-closing, September-April between 8pm-closing). A complimentary audio tour can be obtained by presenting the CityPASS booklet on at the 2nd-floor kiosk. While there is a CityPASS fast lane, it wasn’t open when we visited. However, the regular admission line wasn’t too long of a wait and we reached the top in about 30 minutes.

American Museum of Natural History

New York CityPASSattraction: American Museum of Natural History
CityPASS attraction: American Museum of Natural History
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The museum the world fell in love with after the movie Night at the Museum was released, the American Museum of Natural History is an incredible opportunity to explore over 32 million specimens of nature. Highlights include a 94-foot-long blue whale model, one of the greatest dinosaur fossil collections in the world, and one of the museum’s most popular annual seasonal exhibitions, The Butterfly Conservatory.

New York CityPASS includes general admission to the museum and admission to a 3D movie in the LeFrak IMAX theater.

Metropolitan Museum of Art

New York CityPASS attraction: Metropolitan Museum of Art
CityPASS attraction: Metropolitan Museum of Art
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The largest museum in the United States, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, generally referred to as The Met, has over two million works of art spanning more than 5,000 years. With collections ranging from Arms and Armor, to one of the largest compilations of American art in existence, to an entire wing devoted to Asian art, it has something for every interest.

A clearly-marked CityPASS line is available at the entrance, which enabled us to skip the main ticket line, which was long. Our New York CityPASS admission included general admission and entry to all exhibitions at The Met. Be sure and grab a floor plan on the way in and download The Met’s audio guide app on your smartphone (and take your earbuds). It’s free and very well done.

Statue of Liberty & Ellis Island or Circle Line Sightseeing Cruises

New York CityPASS attraction: Statue of Liberty
CityPASS attraction: Statue of Liberty
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

For the first of our attraction options, we had to decide between the Statue of Liberty & Ellis Island or the Circle Line Cruise. The Circle Line Cruise looked like fun, but it had been years since we’d been out to visit Lady Liberty, so we decided to pay her a call.

The CityPASS booklet contains all of the attraction vouchers and they don’t have to be used in any specific order, just sometime within 9 days of their first use. The Statue of Liberty is a good example of why this is important. The weather forecast for the three days we were in New York City was rainy on day 1, sunny on day 2 and partly sunny on day 3. So, we visited the museums on day 1 while it rained and, as the blue sky in the image above illustrates, our day 2 began with the Statue of Liberty under gorgeous New York skies.

Leaving from Battery Park in Lower Manhattan, our CityPASS included a Statue Cruises ferry ride with stops at Liberty Island and Ellis Island, plus an audio tour on each island and Ellis Island Immigration Museum admission.

New York CityPASS attraction: Statue Cruises
CityPASS attraction: Statue Cruises
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Top of the Rock Observation Deck or the Guggenheim Museum

New York CityPASS attraction: Guggenheim Museum
CityPASS attraction: Guggenheim Museum
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The next option was Top of Rock Observation Deck or the Guggenheim Museum. After visiting The Empire State Building from late afternoon to twilight, we considered using the same-day late-entry pass to re-enter the Empire State Building for night photos and then visiting the Guggenheim the following day. Instead, we opted for Top of the Rock Observation Deck to photograph at night getting a different vantage point. That said, if you haven’t ever been to Guggenheim, it is a fabulous museum.

Showing the CityPASS booklet as we approached on the street, the man at the door waved us through, telling us to skip the upstairs line and proceed downstairs to the ticket counter. There you exchange your CityPASS ticket for the next time-available Top of the Rock general admission ticket which, in our case, was a couple of hours later. We wanted to do the experience at night, so that worked fine for us. At the scheduled time, you return and head through security.

The Top of Rock Observation Deck is actually three floors of 360º viewing at the top of Rockefeller Center. On the 67th & 69th floors, views are through glass panels that have small gaps, which is why the people in the photo below are spaced out as they are. The 70th floor is open, with unobstructed views.

New York CityPASS attraction: 69th floor at Top of the Rock Observation Deck
CityPASS attraction: 69th floor at Top of the Rock Observation Deck
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum or 9/11 Memorial Museum

New York CityPASS attraction: 9/11 Memorial & Museum
CityPASS attraction: 9/11 Memorial & Museum
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

We were staying in Lower Manhattan during our visit and walked over to the 9/11 Memorial the first night after dinner. It is truly stunning.

We’d already discussed which attractions we’d visit during dinner and decided on the Intrepid, so we were actually going to purchase tickets to the 9/11 Museum so we could visit both, but we arrived too late and the museum was closing. It is definitely on our “next time” list.

Our day 3 agenda included a tour of the Intrepid. There was no wait in the CityPASS line and we received general admission tickets and quickly made our way to the ship. Launched in 1943, the former aircraft carrier survived five kamikaze attacks and one torpedo strike during World War II, then went on to serve throughout the Vietnam War. Decommissioned in 1974, the ship nows serves as the Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum, with numerous exhibits and one of the most varied aircraft collections on the east coast. In addition to the Intrepid, the museum is also home to the American guided missile submarine Growler.

New York CityPASS attraction: Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum
CityPASS attraction: Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Is CityPASS New York right for you?

If you plan to visit more than two museums and/or attractions while visiting New York City, you should definitely look into getting a CityPASS. It’s easy to obtain, saves you money and time, and includes the must-visit attractions.

Learn more on the New York CityPASS website.

Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York
Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Disclosure & disclaimer: We received complimentary New York CityPASS booklets for this review. The content & opinions expressed are entirely our own. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.

CityPASS Chicago

CityPASS Chicago: A must for any Chicago visit

Cover: CityPASS Chicago
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


If you are planning a vacation to Chicago, whether for a weekend getaway or a week of sightseeing, CityPASS will save you money and make your time in the Windy City far more enjoyable.

Unfamiliar with CityPASS ticket booklets, as we were not so long ago? They are booklets of prepaid admission tickets to the top attractions in 12 North American cities that save you as much as 53% of the admission price and have you speeding through the fast lane into museums, observations decks, and more.

Save time and money with CityPASS Chicago

Hit the fast lane

I didn’t feel guilty (ok, maybe just a little) as we walked past hundreds of people waiting to get into Willis Tower in Chicago. And the Art Institute. And… well you get the idea.

I am a museum junky. Show me an observation deck and I am there. But, I hate lines. CityPASS to the rescue. This little book gets you into the best attractions in Chicago without standing in the general admission line and, in a city where the major attractions have lines out the door and around the block, that’s a very cool thing.

So, CityPASS saves you time but, does it really save you money?

51% savings with CityPASS Chicago

Visit the CityPASS website or go to one of the attractions and pick up a booklet in person – same price, no worries. I bought ours while standing in a line that would have been over a 3-hour wait to get to the top of Willis Tower. I had the voucher sent via text to my phone, we ducked under the rope and into the CityPASS queue, which was empty, and we were in the elevator and on our way to the observation deck.

About this point, my Cool Adventures partner asked me how much that just cost us. I smiled and said I’d just saved us $200.

How, pray tell? CityPASS includes:

  • Willis Tower Skydeck – Adult FastPass admission $49
  • The Field Museum – Adult admission $35 (Non-blockbuster pass with VIP line access)
  • Shedd Aquarium – Adult admission $40.95 (Shedd Pass at $30.95 plus 2 exhibits $5/each, but without ExpressPass entry, which CityPASS Chicago includes. The Shedd Express Pass at $54.95 has additional shows that are not included with CityPASS Chicago)
  • Choice of 360 Chicago  – Adult FastPass admission $40 or the Museum of Science and Industry – Adult admission Explorer 1 package w/o VIP entry $27
  • Choice of Art Institute of Chicago – Adult FastPass admission $35 or Adler Planetarium – $34.95 All Access Pass

We ended up selecting 360 Chicago and the Art Institute of Chicago, making the value of the attractions we visited over the weekend $197.95. CityPass Chicago is $98 – a 51% savings from purchasing the tickets individually from the attractions. Times two – that was a $199.90 savings.

CityPASS Chicago Attractions

We’ll go through the attractions in the order we visited them, but there is no required itinerary with CityPASS. You simply show up within 9 days of the first use, show your booklet to hop in the fast lane, and they take the appropriate ticket at the admissions counter. If you want to do attend something like a special exhibit that isn’t included, you can pay the fee at the attraction.

Willis Tower

CityPASS Chicago attraction: Skydeck Chicago, Willis Tower
CityPASS attraction: Skydeck Chicago, Willis Tower
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

I still call it Sears Tower, but Skydeck Chicago at Willis Tower is an absolute must visit location. Chicago is such a beautiful city and viewing it from the top of the Western Hemisphere’s second tallest building is the only way to do so.

Entry with CityPass lets you skip the line, and, when arriving at the Skydeck, experience 360° views of the city and step out onto The Ledge – one of four glass floor balconies 103 stories over the streets of Chicago.

The Field Museum

CityPASS Chicago attraction: The Field Museum
CityPASS attraction: The Field Museum
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

The only thing better than going to the Field Museum is going to the Field in the VIP line.

Walking into the museum, Sue the world’s largest, most complete T. rex greets you, welcoming you to explore the 26 million artifacts collected over more than a century by the museum. Our CityPASS admission included an All-Access Pass, which provides viewing of one 3-D film. We chose the Galapagos 3D, knowing we were headed to the Galapagos islands exactly four weeks later – what a great preview!

Shedd Aquarium

CityPASS Chicago attraction: Shedd Aquarium
CityPASS attraction: Shedd Aquarium
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Home to 32,000 aquatic animals, Shedd Aquarium houses more than 1,500 species of fish, reptiles, amphibians, invertebrates, birds and mammals from waters around the world.

Again, VIP entry whisks you into the aquatic world where beluga whales swim by inches away, penguins frolic in the Polar Play Zone, and the dolphins dart through the air. CityPASS includes access to the Waters of the World galleries, Amazon Rising, Wild Reef, Abbott Oceanarium, Polar Play Zone, Amphibians special exhibit, Stingray Touch (May to October), and choice of one 4-D Experience.

Art Institute of Chicago

CityPASS attractions: Art Institute of Chicago
CityPASS attraction: Art Institute of Chicago
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Reaching the point where selections had to be made, our first decision was between the Art Institute of Chicago and Adler Planetarium.

CityPASS Chicago attraction: Adler Planetarium
CityPASS attraction: Adler Planetarium
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

We selected the Art Institute. One of our top two favorite art museums in the world (the other is Musée d’Orsay in Paris), the Art Institute houses a fabulous collection of more than 300,000 works of art, including some of the greatest impressionist paintings and contemporary works in the world.

Once again, we zoomed into the museum via the FastPass lane and our entry included an audio tour. An example of a venue with a special exhibit we wished to view, we purchased the $5 add-on tickets to Van Gogh’s Bedrooms exhibit, which was phenomenal.

360 Chicago

CityPASS Chicago attraction: 360 Chicago
CityPASS attraction: 360 Chicago
Photo: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

On Sunday afternoon we had to make a big decision. Our final admission was either for the Museum of Science and Industry, which we love but have visited several times previously, or to 360 Chicago, the observatory at the John Hancock building.

We decided an evening viewing Chicago from 1000 feet up would be a good way to end our weekend and opted for 360 Chicago. It had started to rain before we arrived at the John Hancock building and, while our entry included Express admission, there wasn’t anyone there. They warned us that visibility was low, but 360 Chicago has a bar and we couldn’t think of a better place to have a drink. After about an hour, the clouds began to clear and we finished off our visit to the Windy City with magnificent views of Chicago below us.

The bottom line

We saved hours of time that would have been spent standing in line and saved $200 with CityPASS during our Chicago weekend. If you only plan to visit two or three attractions, it pays for itself, and with four and five, you have big savings.

Learn more on the CityPASS Chicago website.

Chicago, Illinois
Chicago, Illinois
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Disclosure & disclaimer: We received no compensation for this review. The content & opinions expressed are entirely our own. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.