Ryders Eyewear Cycling Sunglasses

Ryders Eyewear Cycling Sunglasses

Cover: Ryders Eyewear Cycling Sunglasses
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


Things happen when you’re on your bike. Weather conditions change, rocks fly, tree limbs come out of nowhere, and occasionally you hit the ground and things like your sunglasses end up taking the brunt of it all. Ryders Eyewear states they have a solution for many of these issues, so we decided to put their sunglasses to the test.

The Ryders sunglasses tested

We recently tested two Ryders Eyewear models – one pair of the Caliber model and two pair of the Thorn model. We rode with them, ran in them, and also simulated some adverse conditions, checking for performance.

Ryders sunglasses: Thorn – Matte White & Orange with Anti-Fog Photochromic yellow lens US$139.99

Ryders Eyewear Cycling Sunglasses
Ryders Eyewear Cycling Sunglasses
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Ryders sunglasses: Thorn – Matte Black with Anti-Fog Photochromic yellow lens US$129.99

Ryders Eyewear Cycling Sunglasses
Ryders Eyewear Cycling Sunglasses
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Ryders sunglasses Caliber – Camo with Anti-Fog Photochromic brown lens US$129.99

Ryders Eyewear Cycling Sunglasses
Ryders Eyewear Cycling Sunglasses
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Here’s how it went.

Ryders sunglasses: Shatterproof, scratch resistant, durable & flexible

Since I’ve been known to break things the first day I have them, this is where I started. Ryders Eyewear says their lenses are scratch-resistant (not scratch proof) and their durability & flexibility comes from TR90 technology, a type of thermoplastic material. They also state:

All of our lenses are shatterproof, meaning they won’t break up into dangerous little shards when impacted. An extremely strong impact may damage the lens, but it will never shatter. If astronauts trust this material to keep their heads from exploding while on a 17,000 mph space walk, you’ll have nothing to worry about on your adventures, no matter how fast you’re going.

Polycarbonate is the extraordinarily durable thermoplastic that’s used in bulletproof glass, riot shields and astronaut helmets. It’s the ideal material for performance eyewear because of its high impact resistance, inherent UV protection and light weight. All of our lenses are made of polycarbonate.”

Well, the no exploding head thing sounds really good. And, since, I didn’t have any spacewalks in my near future and the closest I typically get to a riot is at a cycling race where there aren’t enough photographer vests (cycling photographers can be a wild bunch), this is what we tried.

1. The “my glasses are on the top of my head, what’s that up there, oops they just fell off back of my head” test.

Test glasses: Thorn white/orange
Result: They survived unscathed.

2. The “big hill coming, I think I’ll tighten my shoe a bit, oops, my glasses just flew across the road” test.

Test glasses: Thorn white/orange
Result: Again, no breakage or scratches.

Ryders Eyewear cycling sunglasses
© Chasing Light Media

Ryders sunglasses: Hydrophobic front

Hydrophobic literally means “fear of water” so the lenses are coated with something that fears water? Ah, it’s more like the water fears the glasses. The hydrophobic coating on the front of the lens causes water to run off and prevents streaking.

Since we are located in a desert and in the middle of a drought, we simulated conditions for the water-related features. We held the glasses under a faucet, wiped the back of the glasses, and then set them on a paper towel to take the image you see below. They performed pretty close to described with just a few beads of water remaining after the equivalent of a downpour.

Ryders Eyewear cycling sunglasses
© Chasing Light Media
Ryders Eyewear cycling sunglasses
© Chasing Light Media

Ryders sunglasses: Anti-fog back

The back of the Ryders lens is coated to “resist fogging, even in the most demanding conditions. It is permanent and washable so you can wipe the lens without the risk of removing its anti-fog properties.” Again, no humidity here. To test, I placed them on the counter while showering. The mirrors and the shower enclosure fogged but the glasses did not.

Ryders sunglasses: Photochromic technology

Photochromic lenses automatically adjust to light conditions.

Ryders states:

When exposed to sunlight, the lenses will start to darken instantly. The time they take to reach maximum darkness depends on a number of factors including the intensity of sunlight and air temperature. Generally speaking, the adjustment from light to dark is quite rapid. The adjustment from dark to light will begin instantly but occur more gradually.”

The yellow lenses are designed for very low light to bright light. The brown lenses are for medium to very bright light. We tested with the camo Calibers with photochromic brown lenses. For this one, I placed the sunglasses outside for 10 minutes, leaving the white anti-fog, photochromic sticker on the lens. When I brought them back inside, I immediately removed the sticker and took this image:

Ryders Eyewear cycling sunglasses
© Chasing Light Media

Ryders sunglasses: UV Protection, optically correct & RXable

Always important with cycling sunglasses, or any sunglasses, eye protection needs to extend to UV protection as well. Ryders provide protection against 100% UVA, UVB, UVC and harmful blue light to 400nm at all tint levels. Some styles are RX-able, with the Caliber falling into this category, depending on your prescription and the capabilities of your lens provider. With regard to optically correct, Ryders states:

The lenses in all of our sunglasses are made by injecting molten polycarbonate into a mold that is specially shaped to eliminate distortion.”

With the exception of goggles, I don’t think I’ve ever experience distortion, but we didn’t with any of the Ryders sunglasses we tested as well.

Ryders sunglasses: Summing it up

Overall, the Ryders sunglasses performed well and provide a good value for the price. They have a wide range of styles and options available from $50 and up. The glasses are very lightweight and both styles fit comfortably. The Calibers weigh 32g and the Thorns weigh 30g. I personally liked the coverage the Calibers provided – the wrap delivers a great field of vision.


Disclosure & disclaimer: We received product samples for evaluation for this review and were not otherwise financially compensated by the sponsor. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.

Opedix® Knee-Tec™ Tights

Opedix® Knee-Tec™ Tights

Opedix® Knee-Tec™ Tights
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


I have bad knees.

Not sure why – it can’t be the years of skiing, cycling, hiking and climbing mountains. So, when I heard about Opedix Knee-Tec tights – tights that have been designed to reduce knee pain during action sports – whoa, that sounded like something I needed to try.

Opedix Knee-Tec Tights in the gym

Opedix® Knee-Tec™ Tights
Opedix® Knee-Tec™ Tights Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

I got my pair of Opedix tights in November and started wearing them to the gym for pre-season ski conditioning.

Opedix® Knee-Tec™ Tights
Opedix® Knee-Tec™ TightsPhoto: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

We went to the gym about every other day in November and December and I wore them every time I went except once, when I wore plain yoga tights, to see if I noticed the difference.  I did. The Opedix tights definitely provided more knee support and I didn’t feel the post gym fatigue and knee soreness that I did when not wearing them.

Opedix Knee-Tec tights
Opedix Knee-Tec tights Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Opedix Knee-Tec Tights on the bike

So, all conditioned and ready to hit the slopes by mid-December and… Mother Nature forgot to send snow to Tahoe. Of course, since we moved from Aspen in May, Colorado was already measuring snow in feet.

So, with no snow, what’s a girl to do – ride a bike of course. The Opedix tights are perfect for winter riding. They are warm, keep your knees aligned well, and are really comfortable when riding.

On the bike I wear them with mountain bike shorts over them for a bit of padding and that works great. I’ve worn compression gear before while riding, but the difference comes from the added knee support – which primarily resulted in reduced after-activity knee pain. So – great in the gym, great on the bike – and… while we’re waiting on some snow to give them a try on the mountain, let’s find out how they work.

Opedix Knee-Tec Tights – how do they work?

According to Opedix:

“Your body is an interconnected system. It consists of myofacial (muscles and connective tissues), articular (joints), and neural (brain and nerves) components. These components have to work closely together and require the sequential coordination of each joint to be properly aligned, stable and mobile to create a movement pattern. The motion produced at any joint in the kinetic chain directly affects the joints above and below it, so, dysfunction in any one component influencing a particular joint may have a direct and detrimental effect on the function of a neighboring joint.”

The Opedix Knee-Tec tights effectively work like one of your body’s muscles, holding things in place and providing stability. By supporting your body’s movement and keeping things aligned where they need to be, you end up with less fatigue, injuries, and pain.

Opedix Knee-Tec Tights on the slopes

Finally, we have snow at Tahoe!

As soon as the first snow fell, we were on the hill at Northstar and I put the Opedix Knee-Tec tights to their first on-mountain test. The tights were warm and provided great support. Cold ski lift rides can turn a warmed-up, functioning knee into a painful, stiff hindrance but the tights kept my knees both warm and functioning well without the restriction a brace causes.  After a full day of skiing, I had no fatigue or joint pain.

Skiing at Northstar, Lake Tahoe
Skiing at Northstar, Lake Tahoe
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Overall, the Opedix Knee-Tec tights are great in the gym, on the bike, and on the slopes. Super comfortable and they provide support around your knees without having to wear a knee brace, which I don’t like to do. They are well constructed, designed well and they look good.

The facts straight from Opedix: Opedix Knee-Tec Tights product features

  • Opedix Knee Tec TightsRetail price: $225
  • 19-panel construction
  • 90% nylon, 10% spandex
  • Gusseted crotch
  • Durable internal stretch draw-cord at the waist
  • Moisture wicking to pull sweat away from the skin’s surface
  • Breathable fabric to help regulate temperature
  • Anti-odor fiber technology to reduce odor and preserve freshness

Disclosure & disclaimer: We received a product sample for evaluation for this review and were not otherwise financially compensated by the sponsor. Some samples are donated following the review. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.

Endevr myID Bracelet

Emergency ID bracelets & notification systems

Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


Practically every cycling fan remembers when Road ID® began airing commercials with Bobke in 2011. A huge hit, the commercials propelled the product, designed to keep sports enthusiasts safer when out on the road, into a commonly known brand.

Since that time, the emergency ID market has matured, with new products and services now available. The simple ID bracelet of 3 years ago that displayed your name and a phone number has been replaced with online databases, proactive crash sensors and a variety of customization options.

Emergency ID and notification systems

While there are quite a few emergency ID bracelet & notification system options available these days, we decided to look at two that are pulling to the front of the pack – Endevr™ my ID™ and ICEdot – and have compared them with the current interactive version of Road ID.

Endevr myID Bracelet
Endevr myID Bracelet
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

To begin – a summary of the emergency ID bracelets and notification system product types:

Standard emergency ID bracelet: A bracelet that typically displays a few lines of information about the wearer, such as name and an emergency contact phone.  No service fee is charged by the provider, but if your information changes, you have to purchase a new bracelet.

ICEdot Crash-SensorInteractive emergency ID bracelets: A bracelet that ties to an online database of information.  A first-responder or medical facility is directed to a website or phone number where detailed information such as emergency contacts, drug allergies, and health insurance information can be accessed.

The bracelet owner can access the database at any time via the web and update information to ensure it is current.  An annual service fee is charged by the provider.

Automatic crash notification system: Changes the notification system from passive (bracelet is worn & hoped to be noticed) to proactive by detecting a crash and notifying an emergency contact.

Emergency ID & notification systems features

Bracelet personalization: The bracelets range from no customization as far as color to having a wide variety of colors & interest personalization badges (cycling, running, Ironman, etc) available.

Medical condition add-ons: Adds a visible medical condition notification, such as a penicillin allergy or diabetic, to the bracelet. Non-bracelet options: Stickers, ID buttons, shoe tags, etc that could be used instead of a bracelet to tie to the service’s online emergency ID & notification database.

Emergency ID & notification systems feature comparisons

At the time of this article, the following is a comparison of the features and pricing of each of the three interactive emergency ID services reviewed:

Online profile

  • Endevr my ID: Yes
  • ICEdot: Yes
  • Road ID: Yes

iPhone app

  • Endevr my ID: Yes
  • ICEdot: Yes
  • Road ID: No

Android app

  • Endevr my ID: No
  • ICEdot: In development
  • Road ID: No

Sizing

  • Endevr my ID: Trim to fit
  • ICEdot: Small, large, child
  • Road ID: S-M, L-XL, or one size fits all

Bracelet warranty/guarantee

  • Endevr my ID: Lifetime
  • ICEdot: No
  • Road ID: ID plate only

Multiple colors and styles

  • Endevr my ID: No
  • ICEdot: No
  • Road ID: Yes

Medical condition add-ons

  • Endevr my ID: Yes
  • ICEdot: No
  • Road ID: Yes

Personal or custom interest add-ons

  • Endevr my ID: Ironman
  • ICEdot: No
  • Road ID: Numerous

Automatic crash notification system

  • Endevr my ID: No
  • ICEdot: Crash Sensor
  • Road ID: No

Availability

  • Endevr my ID: Worldwide
  • ICEdot: US & limited international
  • Road ID: Worldwide

Information shown on bracelet & EMT access

Personal information

  • Endevr my ID: None
  • ICEdot: None
  • Road ID: Name, City & State, Emergency responder access: phone

Emergency responder access

  • Endevr my ID: Phone, QR code
  • ICEdot: Phone, website, text
  • Road ID: Phone, website

Emergency responder access method

  • Endevr my ID: QR code, ID & PIN
  • ICEdot: PIN
  • Road ID: Serial # & PIN

Pricing

Cost per year

  • Endevr my ID: &10, 1st yr included w product purchase, Multi-year discount available
  • ICEdot: $10, 1st yr included w product purchase
  • Road ID: $10, 1st yr included w product purchase

Options

Bracelet

  • Endevr my ID: $40
  • ICEdot: $20
  • Road ID: $15-$24

Stickers

  • Endevr my ID: Free
  • ICEdot: $10
  • Road ID: NA

ID buttons

  • Endevr my ID: NA
  • ICEdot: $20/4
  • Road ID: NA

Automatic crash notification system

  • Endevr my ID: NA
  • ICEdot: $149
  • Road ID: NA

Medical condition add-ons

  • Endevr my ID: $4.99
  • ICEdot: NA
  • Road ID: $5

Disclosure & disclaimer: We received product samples for evaluation for this review and were not otherwise financially compensated by the sponsor. Some samples are donated following the review. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.

Endevr myID Bracelet

Endevr™ myID™ Bracelet

Endevr™ myID™ Bracelet
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


The myID bracelet from Endvr is an emergency identification bracelet that enables first responders or hospital personnel to quickly access emergency contact and medical information.

Endevr myID Bracelet
Endevr myID Bracelet
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Each myID bracelet comes with a unique, scannable QR code, ID, and PIN that links to the owner’s profile and provides emergency contact and medical information. myID bracelets come in 3 color options: black/grey, turquoise/black, and white/grey.

What comes with the myID bracelet?

Endevr myID Bracelet
Endevr myID Bracelet
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Each package has the myID bracelet, a slider that has the unique QR code, ID, and PIN, a myID sizing tape to measure your wrist, stickers & a wallet card to record your ID & pin. The waterproof band can easily be cut to size.  The first year of service is included, so the next step is to get a myID bracelet profile established.

Endevr myID Bracelet
Endevr myID Bracelet
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Setting up the myID bracelet profile

Endevr myID Bracelet
Endevr myID Bracelet
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

A myID profile can be created at http:myidband.com/activate, which also can be accessed by scanning the QR code found on the back of the band’s slider.

On the website, a profile can be set up using the ID & PIN found on the back of myID bracelet which links the profile to the myID bracelet.

The profile information can include:

  • Vital medical conditions. Condition and notes.
  • Personal information. Name, birthdate, gender, hair color, height, weight, blood type, organ donor, photo.
  • Address
  • Emergency contacts. Names and phone numbers.
  • Allergies. Allergies and notes.
  • Medications. Medications and notes.
  • Physicians. Physician name, business name, title, phone number, city, state (Multiple can be listed).
  • Insurance information. Insurance provider, ID number, group number, bin number, deductible, customer service phone number, notes.
  • Linked myID products. ID and pin.
Endevr myID Bracelet
Endevr myID Bracelet
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

myID bracelet condition specific sliders

With interactive emergency ID bracelets still fairly new, it is a concern that the first responder or hospital personnel will not understand what an emergency ID bracelet is and does.

While most providers are working to educate the industry, many in the medical profession still recommend the old medical alert bracelets they have been trained to look for to identify specific conditions.

myID has a combined solution to address this issue with condition-specific sliders available for $4.99 each.

The conditions currently available include: peanut allergy, diabetes 1, diabetes 2, hearing impaired, autism, penicillin, vision impaired, seizures, shellfish allergy, tree nut allergy, Alzheimer’s, dementia, morphine, emphysema, mentally impaired, pulmonary conditions, sickle cell anemia, blood disorder, insect allergies, kidney disease, epilepsy, and pacemaker.

Endevr myID Bracelet
Endevr myID Bracelet
Photo: Greg K. Hull © Chasing Light Media

The facts straight from Endevr myID

  • myID Cadence bracelet: $40
  • Lifetime Warranty
  • Complete online medical profile
  • 1-year subscription to Premium Online Health Profile included free
  • Premium Profile just $9.99 per year after that
  • Rapid QR code access
  • Fully adjustable fit – Trim to fit
  • Optional Side Sliders Available for specific conditions

myID bracelet product specifications

Weight: 4 oz. / 45g
Width: 1/8 in. / 4mm
Height: 1 in. / 22mm
Sizes: Fully Adjustable
Materials: Silicone / Stainless Steel
Ion Count: 800/cc


Disclosure & disclaimer: We received product samples for evaluation for this review and were not otherwise financially compensated by the sponsor. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.

FootBalance QuickFit Insoles

FootBalance Custom Insoles for Cycling Shoes

FootBalance QuickFit Insoles
FootBalance QuickFit Insoles
Photo credit: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures
© Chasing Light Media

If your feet hurt, you are not going to have a good day. And, that goes for time on the bike as well. Normally, I’m fine for an hour or two ride, but after that, some foot pain definitely begins to set in – usually an aching in the arch.

My hard-plastic, custom insoles won’t fit in my cycling shoes. So, when I heard about the new FootBalance custom insoles for cycling shoes, which they said could be created in less than 10 minutes, I wanted to know more.

FootBalance Custom Insoles in practice

I have tried the FootBalance Performance custom insoles in both my cycling shoes and in standard street shoes and have used them for both short and long distances.

The insoles have performed well. They are very comfortable, were easy to insert into the shoes, not even needing any trimming, and have held up well after a little over a month of use. For cycling, the insoles provide extra arch support and that definitely reduces foot fatigue.

Having worn custom, plastic inserts for several years in street shoes, it was an interesting comparison. The FootBalance custom insoles are far more comfortable and a couple of hundred dollars cheaper than my other inserts.  I suspect my old hard plastic insoles will last longer (they are basically indestructible) but at $79.99 US for the FootBalance insoles, they could be replaced several times before reaching the same amount I shelled out for my old insoles.

The facts straight from FootBalance

FootBalance Performance custom insoles

100% custom footbed is heat-molded expressly to riders’ feet in about 10 minutes at FootBalance dealer locations

MSRP $79.99

Ideal for:

  • Tight, low volume or performance footwear such as cycling shoes, spikes, soccer shoes, skates, minimalist and natural running footwear
  • Low to medium impact sports and activities
  • Individuals who benefit from light support but great for all foot types

Features:

  • Sizes-34-48
  • Weight-1.4oz/40grams
  • Materials: D200 Silver Ion, High-Abrasion, Anti-microbial, Anti-odor

FootBalance has multiple lines of insoles for a wide variety of sports, including their new QuickFit line that can be molded at home.


Disclosure & disclaimer: We received product samples for evaluation for this review and were not otherwise financially compensated by the sponsor. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.

Bollé Cycling Glasses

What makes a good pair of cycling sunglasses?

Bollé Cycling Glasses
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media
Article by Kim Hull


Cycling sunglasses interviews

They protect you, enhance your vision, and can say a great deal about your personality. Sunglasses.

More specifically, cycling sunglasses. Definitely, where form meets function.

We interviewed reps from four of the hottest makers in cycling eyewear products at Interbike …

and got the details – from fan favorites to what to look for in 2014 – and then summed it up along with photos, cool new features to look for, and of course, how much they’ll each set you back.

But first, what makes a good pair of cycling sunglasses?

Protection

First, and foremost, cycling sunglasses must protect your eyes and face. That includes:

  • Blocking the sun with 100% UV protection
  • Shielding your eyes and face from wind, debris, rain, bugs & glare

Value

Few of us fall into the “price is no object” category, so how much that new pair of cycling shades costs is a factor.However, the price needs to be balanced with quality, durability, versatility, comfort & protection.

Vision

While optimists may always want to look at the world through rose-colored glasses, they probably never rode 60 miles on a bright, sunny day. Instead of buying a different set of glasses for each condition (and hoping you have them with you when the light changes), interchangeable lenses are the hottest feature in town.

In addition to thinking about the size of the lenses in your new pair of cycling sunglasses, which can affect peripheral vision, what colors or tints are available? While most manufacturers have a wide variety of lens colors, in general:

  • Grey or brown lenses tend to be best overall in reducing brightness in a medium to bright light.
  • Amber or gold lenses are good in low light and tend to enhance depth perception (why they are used frequently in ski goggles).
  • Rose lenses truly make the world a brighter place (good for low or variable light, but not good on bright days).
  • Clear lenses are great for protection on a cloudy or rainy day.

Versatility

Instead of buying a different set of glasses for each condition (and hoping you have them with you when the light changes), interchangeable lenses are the hottest feature in town.

Extra lenses can easily slip into your pocket or be stored in your seat pack and quickly be changed on a ride.  But then, what if the lenses change by themselves?

Comfort

Poor fitting cycling sunglasses can make your head hurt, literally. Take your helmet to the store and try them on with your helmet on and holding your head like you are riding a bike.  The fit at that angle may be nothing like it is just casually checking yourself out in the mirror.  Other things to think about:

  • Fit
  • Weight
  • Air-flow / circulation
  • Prescription options, if needed

Let’s check out some hot new cycling shades

Bollé

Bollé cycling sunglasses
Bollé cycling sunglasses Photo credit: Kim Hull, Cool Adventures © Chasing Light Media

Bollé has long been known as a provider of quality sunglasses, having manufactured and distributed eyewear worldwide for decades. What’s new in Bollé’s cycling sunglass line?

  • Bollé’s Vortex are versatile & available in a wide range of frame & lens colors
  • Bollé introduces the Breakaway & the 6th Sense specifically designed for cyclists in early 2014.

Transitions

Transitions cycling sunglassesOakley TransitionsTransitions, long known for their lenses that automatically change from light to dark and back, have partnered with Oakley and Nike to bring sports sunglasses to the market.Specifically for cyclists – Oakley Transitions in frames like Fast Jacket that are already a big hit with cyclists and Nike MAX Transitions, which come in at a very nice price point.With transitions – interchangeable is automatic.

Smith Optics

Smith Optics Pivlock Overdrive cycling sunglassesSmith Optics knows a thing or two about eyewear designed for outdoor conditions and speed.In 1965, Dr. Bob Smith, founder of Smith Optics, created of the first ski goggle with a sealed thermal lens & breathable vent foam.That same innovation can be seen in Smith Optics’ cycling sunglasses with the Pivlock line, which makes swapping lenses quick & easy. Their two new models, Pivlock Overdrive and the Pivlock V2, both come with 3 interchangeable lenses.

Optic Nerve

Optic Nerve Cycling Glasses
Optic Nerve Cycling Glasses
Photo: Greg K. Hull, Cool Adventure © Chasing Light Media

Colorado-based Optic Nerve ranks high on the value scale.Optic Nerve’s popular Neurotoxin is lightweight & flexible, comes with interchangeable lenses, and at $79, was one of the lowest priced options we found that was still feature-rich.In the spring of 2014, Optic Nerve introduces the SideSwipe™, their new interchangeable lens system.


Disclosure & disclaimer: We received product samples for evaluation for this review and were not otherwise financially compensated by the sponsor. Some samples are donated following the review. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.

Transitions cycling sunglasses

Oakley® Transitions® & Nike® MAX Transitions

Transitions cycling sunglassesSo, you get a new pair of cycling sunglasses with interchangeable lenses, head out for a ride on a bright sunny day, and an hour into your ride clouds roll in.  Time to switch lenses… but, oh yeah, you left them at home.

There’s a solution – Transitions.

You’ve probably heard of them or seen them at the optical shop – the lenses that go from light to dark depending on the outdoor light. Transitions are now available for sports sunglasses, including Oakley & Nike MAX. Take a look…

Oakley Transitions & Nike MAX Transitions

Transitions Adaptive Sunwear

The facts straight from Transitions

Transitions adaptive sunglasses use the advanced photochromic technology from Transitions Optical – but, unlike Transitions lenses, Transitions sunwear products may have an initial tint and are designed to enhance visual performance in specific outdoor activities. Like everyday Transitions lenses, Transitions adaptive sunglasses block 100% of UVA and UVB rays.

Tint

Transitions adaptive sunglasses are self-adjusting, meaning they automatically darken and lighten depending on the brightness of the outdoor light.Ordinary sunglasses are designed to block a specific light level – which is why, in certain low-lighting situations, some sunglasses can seem too dark, while in brighter conditions, they are not dark enough.Through its advanced photochromic technology, Transitions Optical is able to help reduce the higher luminance (bright light) to more comfortable levels, while not blocking too much light in lower light conditions, so wearers continue to experience optimal performance, regardless of lighting conditions.

Color

Transitions Optical has developed more than 3,500 different photochromic dyes that cover the entire color spectrum, all of which can be blended to achieve any desired color and to meet the needs of specific tasks.

  • Clear to Black Iridium lenses are designed to adapt automatically in a range of light conditions, from low-light/overcast to extremely sunny.
  • Red tinted lenses eliminate road glare and allow calming red light to enter the eye, which helps during endurance sports like cycling.
  • Rose lenses enhance contrast and increase brightness. They are most effective in bright and flat light, or in hazy conditions. They provide a warmer appearance and improve depth perception and contours.

Polarization

Commonly used in regular sunglasses, polarized lenses help to block light and eliminate blinding (reflected) glare. They enable the eye to view objects otherwise hidden by reflected light while improving comfort and minimizing eye fatigue.Polarized lenses are ideal for situations where glare is caused by light being reflected off of flat surfaces, such as glass, concrete, water, ice or snow.

Performance Frame Fit

Choosing a sunwear frame is part personal style preference, part fit.By partnering with best-in-class brands like Oakley® and Nike®, Transitions adaptive sunglasses and shields are available in a variety of performance styles that can help add to a visual advantage during sports and activities.

Oakley Transitions

Oakley offers both prescription and non-prescription sunglasses.  Available in multiple colors and frame styles, including the Fast Jacket, Flak Jacket, and Half Jacket, they all activate to darker, neutral tints to allow athletes to maintain peak performance.

Nike MAX Transitions

Nike offers non-prescription lenses in proprietary tints (golf, outdoor and speed), designed to be both responsive to changing light and specifically engineered to sport performance. Available in the Show X2 and SQ (golf and outdoor) and Tailwind (Speed) frame styles.

Summing it up

Oakley TransitionsOakley Transitions cycling sunglasses

  • Available in multiple Oakley colors and frame styles, including the Fast Jacket, Flak Jacket, and Half Jacket
  • Comes with Transitions clear to dark Iridium® lenses
  • Prescription lenses available
  • Prices range from $180 – $300, depending on frame style (with non-prescription lenses)

Nike MAX Speed Tint cycling sunglassesNike MAX Transitions cycling sunglasses

  • Available in the Tailwind, Show XS, and SQ frame styles
  • Comes with Transitions SpeedTint lenses
  • Prices range from $119 – $210

Disclosure & disclaimer: We received product samples for evaluation for this review and were not otherwise financially compensated by the sponsor. Reviews are opinion only and Chasing Light Media accepts no responsibility for how the information is used.